DAY I ALMOST CHOKED EATING SUSHI WITH FAZLE ABED; he was telling the story- my greatest mistake was spending my life savings on building homes for 100000 refugees. Being an engineer I knew how to do that. But as we were opening the meta-village a young lady came up to me : what education/enterprises do we need to prevent dozens of girls dying every week? So she & I learnt we needed to innovate 5 last mile services for any space girls are born- safe homes, education, health, food, finance; in searching we soon found a billion village mothers wanting to COLLAB. ..mothers 1
Download 2-page guide ...consider cases of new nations after world war 2- how many cases lived up to the peoples simplest dreams, end poverty, food/health/safety for every family member, education geared to decent jobs and happiness? bangladesh did something different- empowering 90% of women to find partners in building their own communities- .over 50 years a new economic model emerged which a billion asian women applied to end extreme poverty- how?.sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communitY 1 PLATFORMS 1 PLATFORMS 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
examples from abed builder of largest ngo partnership: Reeta Roy MCF 3.3 1billion$ to vaccinate continent africa 4.3 uganda; Soros 1.1-1.6 ineteconomics bottom-up, 4.4 new university OSUN 3.4 end TB; Gates 1.1-1.6 digital finance; 2.1-2.6 extending mpesa in tanzania's green revolution; world bank 1.3 first 100 ultra poor nations co-researchers, 4,4 first 100 nations early childhood play co-researchers
in contrast tu unicorns, we define hunicorns as billion dollar startup networks to valuable to human life for exiting investors or quarrelsome political parties -hall of fame first 1000 hunicorn collabs with sir fazle abed

36 alumni networks for sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communities 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
.
...2016 bangladesh e-digital schools nationwide :: bangla video:::: brookings video:: :::brac how did this happen?
The Economist 1977

2020s earthlings have the great good fortune that over 50 years from 1970 to 2019, fazle abed helped 1 billion asian women end poverty through 6 connected community building networks celebrating the first 5 sdgs and youth mediating everything else to be first sdg generation -each with a collaboration legacy -we're here to help yu find the network you can most help empower further
ending poverty, celebrating sustainability goals & youthful community building = most enjoyable ways to network; fazle abed (oil company engineer inspired by franciscan values) helped billion asian mothers do this over 50 years - join most exciting action learning networks and lets map AI algorithms = optimal livesmatter community builders -2021 join in glasgow cop26 & dubai rewired greatest youth meetings ever with thanks to abed.games youthmarkets.com & worldrecordjobs.com
xx

Which 30 educational and economic partnerships most empower a billion women to end extreme poverty, and value their children’s sustainability? Fortunately for those caring about sustainability 2020s, we can map this by around partners and alumni of 50 years of servant leadership by fazle abed 1970-2019 together with legacy specifications mapped through his final decade

Viewed from 1970, Increasing life expectancy from 25 years below to average helped gravitate development economics world’s most trusted partnership – hence sustainability last mile service markets

3) last mile health
2) agriculture for village food security


4)non-linear livelihood education
5) timing what platforms partners could facilitate entrepreneurial revolution not not just inclusive community but cooperation in full and meaningful entrepreneurial employment

financial entreprenurial revolution for nation's people history excluded from machine age


Saturday, July 31, 2021

2.4 brac poultry leads to 14+ brac national enterprises 2.6

 although chickens for laying eggs is cited as one of the most typical small enterprises supported by village microfinance all over the developing world , there is noting typical about brac chicken/poultry -not the least in terms of resiliency stories

over more than 20 years multiple components businesses came together to form a total village to national market supply chain - brac calls such total value leadership models brac enterprises- and we regard brac poultry as a, if not the, benchmark case to understand value chain leadership linking one village to 100000 villages to national market leader and global exemplar

in the journal of social business we have noted inter alia:

poultry is the source of over a million micofranchised enterprises- positive cash flow earnedby village women

villagers play mainly one of 5 roles only one of which is maintaining a village's chickens for laying eggs

the 4 other main components that interlock/:

breeding superchickens

vet services for chiekens - laying 5 to 10 times more eggs than the traditional scrawny village chicken these birds do need more expert attention

chicken feed - with such a huge bird population to feed abed was concerned to mimimise use of land that could grow human food- one answer used both for chicken feed and mulberry bushes for silk rearing was utilisation of road-side land not suited for human food cultivation 

coordinating distribution beyond the village now that more eggs were being procced than villagers needed 

https://www.brac.net/images/Chicken_Factsheet.pdf this factsheet shows how the complete model including chicken for national consumption came together in 2004 as a lead case for what have become bracs 14 national enterprises -http://www.brac.net/brac-enterprise



we date brac chicken as mainly coming together as a leader of the whole pultry value chain in our 3rd dedade of brac 1992-2002 which is also when brac began to add nationwide capabilities to what over its first quarter of a century connected mainly village fieldworkers -it was onlt from 1996 that tech partners came to bangladesh villages in mo0bile and solar - up until 1996 village/rural meant being cut off without access to electricity grids or indeed any of the advances since 1760 of the age of machines and humans- banglsdesh and asian village empowerment has had a lot of leapfroging to do in what is brac's 2nd quarter of a century as fazle abed's last with his death in dec 2019

quoting from brac chicken factsheet:

In the late 1970s, BRAC identified poultry rearing as a source of income for the landless, particularly the destitute women. However, local chickens were generally undernourished and meat and egg yields were poor in villages. In the early 1980s BRAC partnered in a participatory action research programme aimed at increasing the productivity of small flocks of hens in village conditions and to develop a replicable smallholder model, the success of which led to the development of the national broiler chicken industry. The model involved women in a chain of activities as vaccinators, hatchery operators, chicken rearers, feed sellers, producers of hatching eggs and as producers of eggs for the market. Credit as well as marketing was integrated into the model. Over time, BRAC social enterprises were set up to facilitate each of these activities. 

BRAC Chicken, established in 2004, was the final link within this chain. The enterprise was established to meet growing demands for dressed chicken in large metropolitan areas, by purchasing chickens from BRAC’s poultry rearing farms, other commercial farms, and rural farmers. BRAC Chicken Worker weighing chicken before it is sent for processing A BRAC Social Enterprise Driving growth in the poultry sector by increasing the supply of processed broiler meat BRAC Chicken today With the only automated plant of its kind in Bangladesh, the enterprise currently processes approximately 10,000 birds per day, which are sourced from a large number of independent rural farmers. The plant purchases chickens from BRAC’s commercial broiler farms and independent farmers, and sells the dressed meat to a variety of customers including large restaurants, hotels, supermarkets and even individual households. Given that the demand for poultry meat and eggs still exceeds the supply, our poultry operations remain an important source of support for rural farmers while driving growth in the sector and increasing the supply of high-yield variety chicks and processed broiler meat

======================================

-please see footnote for list of brac 14 enterprises

1 seed and agro enterprises 3.1,3.2 (core value chain dev 1972=2001)

2 sericulture from 78 - an inspiring compoent of brac 3.3 crafts whose enterprise is called 

3 aarong overall crafts merchandising

4 brac salt - original motivations to combat iodine defiency od all and various added deficiencies of children started iut of cox's bazaar 2001

5 brac chicken 3.4

6 brac dairy - formally stsrted in 1998 abed tells stories of timing of when to start dried milk production vital- had to wait til eu hadstpopped dumping- this enterprise also led to

7 brac artificial insemination

8 brac delivery kits qnd sanitary towels- maternal delivery kit production/distribution started 1998 - the enterprise took on different scale with amagamation of brac sanitary towels from 2004

9 brac cold storage

10 brac printing pack

11 brac fisheries although support for value chain of fish has been mapped by brac since 1976- the enterpruse formed in 2008 after successful piloting of brac fush farms

12 brac recycled handmade paper- while the value chain started in 2000 it became a full enterprise in 2009

13 brac forestry

14 to verify

world bank, dhaka branch,  jan 2015 

The ‘science of delivery’, or bringing the right kinds of services effectively to the poor, is the key to eradicate extreme poverty, said Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, the founder and chairman of BRAC, the world’s largest NGO. 


Image

The under-five child mortality in Bangladesh has decreased from 180 deaths per 1,000 live births in the 1980s to 53 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011. The child survival rate in Bangladesh has surpassed that in neighboring countries.

smail Ferdous/World Bank

While visiting the World Bank Bangladesh office, he shared how perfecting the science of delivery helps reduce poverty; saves lives; brings prosperity; and how one impact is linked with another.

In 1972 BRAC started working on integrated rural development in Bangladesh. The country had an alarmingly low child survival rate at the time. Diarrhea was among the leading causes of the death of children. BRAC took the lead in popularizing the Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) to prevent diarrhea. Bangladesh now has the world’s highest ORT usage rate. Thanks to ORT and the later success in child immunization, the under-five child mortality in Bangladesh has decreased from 180 deaths per 1,000 live births in the 1980s to 53 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011. The child survival rate in Bangladesh has surpassed that in neighboring countries.

A mother needs boiled water, sugar and salt from her kitchen to prepare ORT. A simple solution, but the challenge was to reach the millions of mothers, teach them how to prepare the saline solution and ensure the proper feeding of sick children.

BRAC employed female health workers from the community to go door to door and teach mothers to prepare and administer ORT. The rural and often illiterate mother would need to remember 7 simple points of ORT.  The health workers used to mark their utensils to measure half a liter of water, adding a pinch of salt with the fingertips and a fistful of molasses, a substitute to sugar in villages.

“BRACs methodology always focuses on strong monitoring mechanism to measure the progress of any intervention and maintain quality and accountability,” says Sir Abed. BRAC representatives would randomly monitor 10 percent of households. Each health worker received 10 Takas ($.12) per household if the mother could remember the 7 points of ORT accurately.

Unfortunately, the first round of monitoring showed a disappointing 6 percent household usage rate.  BRAC realized that the health workers themselves did not believe in the intervention. BRAC trained the health workers to show how ORT works. The new found belief in the intervention increased the usage rate to 19%, but still far below making a meaningful impact nationally.

Further analysis showed that men felt undermined by not being adequately engaged. BRAC workers started to engage the fathers. To cut time and cost by half, workers started teaching mothers in groups instead of an one on one basis and monitoring the monitors.  Meetings were organized in markets, schools and mosques to explain the benefits of ORT. National TV and radio launched a campaign to popularize ORT.  Once the whole village was mobilized, the results were remarkable.

Sir Abed said, “It involved several incremental steps to deliver the desirable service to the poor. First, making the program effective; second, refining the intervention based on the trial and error to make it efficient; and third, a focus on robust monitoring and accountability mechanism allowing the scaling up of the intervention nationwide.

Citing examples of interlinked development impacts, Sir Abed highlighted that the fertility rate among Bangladeshi women declined during the same period. Bangladesh today has almost achieved a replacement level fertility rate of 2.2 children per women.

The experience shows that through efficient delivery, simple local solutions can bring positive changes in the lives of millions. And to do so, we need to identify effective and available avenues of delivery, easy ways of scaling up the initiative, learn from the failures and rectify. We learn, at each stage, vigilant monitoring, impact assessment, and quick redesigns to improve the intervention.

The delivery mechanism in ORT initiative reconciles with many projects within the Bank to reach out to the poorest of the society.  This experience  can be applied to bring services to millions of people worldwide for poverty reduction and human development.

Bangladesh has shown remarkable progress through simple solutions as ORT. These efforts could be replicated as a model in any development project world-wide,” remarked Sir Abed ending his knowledge sharing with staff in the Dhaka office.

1.1 1.2 1billiongirls economic model transformed every system eg 3.1 3.3 2.5 1.5 4.4 girls need to be empowered by instead of be powered over

 One of the last interviews made of fazle abed covering 1970-2017- ngo advisor had just rated brac most effective /efficient 

“The idea behind BRAC is to change systems of inequity” says Sir Fazle, CEO of BRAC

you can find a come bottle in every corner of the world but not alwasy a vaccine

Published by Jean-Christophe Nothias on January 6, 2017 related search "science of delivery"

As NGO Advisor announces the new edition of the Top 500 NGOs, we’ve decided to launch a series of interviews with executives of organisations that are part of the rankings, the Ivy League of the “for-good” world. Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, Founder and Chairperson of BRAC, opens the series on behalf of 118,000+ employees working for what we acknowledge as the most influential and impactful for-good organisation worldwide.

by Jean-Christophe Nothias | Editor-in-chief, NGO Advisor

 

Jean-Christophe Nothias (JCN): Being ranked #1 (again in 2018) is an achievement and a fantastic recognition, but it is also challenging. Is there a “too big to fail” risk associated with BRAC?

Sir Fazle Hasan Abed (Sir Fazle): First, on behalf of the entire BRAC family, allow me to express my deepest gratitude for NGO Advisor’s recognition. There are many civil society organisations in the world today working diligently to bring about change in their societies. For BRAC to be placed at or near the top of such a list is a great honour indeed.

I would not say BRAC could ever be “too big to fail.” In Bangladesh, many of the functions that previously only BRAC and other nongovernmental organizations were able to provide are increasingly performed by the State. Successive governments in Bangladesh have been able to reach many more communities through State primary schools, for instance. We see this as a sign of great success. 

I would add that “failure” is not seen as a bad thing at BRAC. I have always encouraged our staff to view failure as an opportunity to improve the services we provide.3.1 During our child survival campaign of the 1980s, our earliest pilots were actually a disaster. This was BRAC’s first attempt to go to a nationwide scale, with a training program that taught rural women how to mix and administer their own oral rehydration solution for children’s diarrhea using locally available water, sugar and salt. At first, fewer than 10 percent of the mothers we had trained actually used the solution. 5.1 We revised the training again and again until we achieved a 100 percent success rate, and then scaled it up to reach every mother in Bangladesh.

 

JCN: As we explore the non-profit world looking for excellence, it seems like successful organisations are designed more like ‘systems’ than specialized ventures. BRAC addresses a diversity of concerns and embeds many different types of entities to act, some being non-profit, some for-profit corporations. Do you believe this is the future, in order to have a lasting impact and be sustainable? Will social enterprise revolutionize a non-profit sector that is still sticking to the charity approach?

Sir Fazle: The idea behind BRAC is to change systems of inequity, that is true. There are some BRAC programs, however, such as our 1.3 ultra-poor graduation program, which are always likely to require some level of subsidy. I would not call this a “charity approach”, however, since the aim is always to graduate the poorest into sustainable livelihoods, instead of remaining reliant on others.

There are many ways to change the basic conditions of society. One is the social enterprise approach. To use one example—2.5 BRAC built a dairy company called Aarong Dairy, which purchases milk from women farmers many of whom took microloans to buy cows. It is now the largest private dairy company in Bangladesh. This represents one way to create greater opportunities for the poor efficiently and at scale.

But government, civil society organizations, social enterprises, and for-profit corporations all have a role to play. There is no one-size-fits-all model.

I’ve always recognised that donor funding wouldn’t always be there for us. In order to provide long-term solutions at scale—to create significant change in a country like Bangladesh, or in any of the other 10 countries where we work—we have sought a degree of sustainability by developing our own sources of income. I believed we should try never be too reliant on donors.

With microloans, for instance, we recover our costs through service fees charged to clients. We also run social enterprises that serve the poor while generating a surplus for BRAC, in sectors as varied as dairy, textile and 3.2 seeds. This surplus is used to fund programs like education and health.

We even have a commercial bank, 1.4 BRAC Bank, which operates 1.5 bKash, a mobile money platform. By some measures, including the number of regular clients—about 25 million—bKash is now the largest mobile money platform in the world.

Yet it is important to stress that many of our most successful programs, including most of our operations outside Bangladesh, still rely on donor contributions. Our operations in Bangladesh are close to 80% self-financed and, with support from our partners, I anticipate that this proportion will rise in the coming years.

JCN: With an organisation of over 118,000 employees being so impactful, do you think that BRAC has become a poster boy for management schools? Has the Harvard Business School included BRAC in its curriculum?

Sir Fazle: Harvard Business School has indeed prepared several case studies on BRAC which are included in its curriculum. In development circles, one of the things we are best known for is the “science of delivery”—the efficient delivery of services to people in need. This is something businesses can learn from as well.

I agree with Jim Kim, the World Bank president and a proponent of the science of delivery, who says it’s no longer so much a question of what to deliver, but how to deliver it. Perfecting the science of delivery, even for very simple ideas such as the oral rehydration therapy mentioned earlier, can help us uproot even the most deeply entrenched poverty.

If BRAC is emblematic of anything, however, I would like to hope it is a concerted, long-term effort to transform the basic conditions of one’s society.

 

Would you say that young citizens with a fresh diploma should join an organisation such as BRAC or look for a job in the banking industry?

Sir Fazle: When young people approach me about starting a career in development, I often suggest they spend a couple of years working in the private sector first. When I worked at Shell Oil, I learned how to manage large operations efficiently, something I think served me well when I started BRAC.

That said, for those with a desire to serve others, especially people born with few advantages and opportunities, a career in this field is extremely satisfying. At BRAC, I have always tried to give people substantial responsibility coupled with an appropriate level of authority so they have the space to learn, develop and even make mistakes!

 

JCN: BRAC’s assumption is that poverty is a system and its underlying causes are manifold and interlinked. Is BRAC a challenge to politicians, or to put it a little differently, do politicians see BRAC as representing some sort of a challenging or competing power to their public duties and power?

Sir Fazle: Certainly not, although perhaps we are a challenge to corrupt politicians. There are many functions, such as education and health care, which can and should be performed by a well-functioning State. As mentioned earlier, the Bangladeshi government has recently done a much better job of making sure that people from poorer areas and backgrounds have access to primary schools. In situations like this, BRAC has very willingly stepped back to let the government do its job.

Politicians tend to see BRAC as a resource, not as a competing power. We provide teacher training to improve state school systems, for example. 4.4 Through BRAC University, we are educating a new generation of civil servants in Bangladesh. Our community health programs work alongside formal health systems, not in competition with them—linking the poor with government clinics, for example, or guiding a pregnant woman to a hospital when complications occur, so that she may have a safe birth surrounded by trained medical personnel. Wherever we work, we seek to help governments function better, not to replace the government.

 

JCN: Over the next five years, BRAC aims at creating a more inclusive society in Bangladesh, one where inequalities would not rise. Can anyone stop such a tide?

Sir Fazle: Having witnessed such change since Bangladesh’s independence in 1971, I am an optimist. Life expectancy was just 47 years in 1971, due largely to the high rate of child mortality. About a quarter of children did not live to the age of 5. Now life expectancy exceeds 70, and the under-5 mortality rate is less than 40 per 1,000 per live births. Maternal mortality has decreased by 75 percent since 1980; infant mortality has more than halved since 1990. We have also brought down fertility rates from about seven children per woman to replacement level. It has been said that such rapid changes in public health have almost no historical precedent, save perhaps for Japan following the Meiji Restoration.

I believe these changes have taken place in large part because we have developed a more inclusive society—one in which women are empowered to make their own decisions, such as to educate their daughters, instead of being oppressed by patriarchal traditions. Although Bangladesh is still a very conservative society, we have not only met but exceeded gender parity in education, meaning there are now more girls in school than boys. This is a tremendous achievement.

Yes, there are forces that can stop the tide, including the instability of our institutions and threats to law and order. These are challenges faced the world over. We have faced them in the past and come through them, so I remain an optimist.

 

JCN: As regards its international expansion, where do you see BRAC’s next battles?

Sir Fazle: 1.6 We are developing a strategy to broaden our international outreach, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the basic conditions of many people’s lives remain much the same as when we started in Bangladesh. I would like to see BRAC launch operations in several more countries there in the coming years.

 

JCN: If there were a ‘Davos of the non-profit sector’ sometime soon, would you like to participate and what would your keynote speech be about?

Sunday, July 25, 2021

3.4 fighting tb and the world's deadliest animal - malaria's mosquito

 the global fund bundles budgets for malaria. tb and aids together

in 2005 gates awarded abed their health prize mainly for innovation in fighting tb but also malaria

at brac the worldwide knowhow leader for tb and malaria is i think the same


brac brief on malaria and tb

hence 2021 latest repotfro gates on malaria may be of interest

By Bill Gates | August 25, 2021
Welcome to Mosquito Week 2021 on the Gates Notes.
Last year, many people feared a malaria catastrophe. An analysis by the World Health Organization found that disruptions to malaria control and treatment due to COVID-19 could lead to a dramatic increase in malaria deaths in sub-Saharan Africa.
A year later, I’m happy to report that this worst-case scenario, at least for now, has been avoided.
This Mosquito Week I share the story of how African countries averted disaster by quickly adapting their malaria programs to meet the challenges of the pandemic.
I also highlight the research the U.S. military is doing to combat the mosquito, which has caused more casualties for troops than bombs and bullets.
Finally, I provide an update on an amazing breakthrough that might control the spread of dengue fever, a terrible mosquito-borne disease that infects 400 million people every year.
Thanks for your interest in learning about all the innovation underway to fight diseases spread by the world’s deadliest animal.

Saturday, July 24, 2021

4.5 early childhood education

2001 30 YEARS INTO FINDING PARTNERSHIPS TO SUSTAIN THE POOREST ASIAN VILLAGE WOMEN- Fazle Abed decided to take up Mrs Steve Jobs challenge - why cant women globally share in sdg 5-4-3-2-1 solutions you have helped billion poorest asian women to co-create. 

Abed's answer was to create brac university 4.4 ,  and to start creating masters that had never been offered before. 4.5 MA in early childhood education - started at brac university 16 years ago, this has become the most massive new education movement- the world bank catalogues over 100 projects and that's just in the developing world- while not everyone studies early childhood the way abed designed it - LEGO does, the world's number 1 education luminaries out of hong kong CELEBRATED BY TECH BILLIONNAIRE YIDAN do -

 why because abed specified that loveq was what mattered most  wherever playschools live up to a billion women and his legacy: joy, safety, collaboration confidence of the early child and the loving relationship with and by her teacher and the community- make sense? learn more on 4.5  - if machine intel is to help save us in 2020s from pandemics and climate we'll need todays youth to be the most loving, collaborative, refugee caring across borders ever born and bred

Friday, July 23, 2021

5.2 culture at heart of sdgs

unesco 2013 congrees hangzhou- cultural declaration
  • Irina Bokova (Panel Chair), the Director-General of the United Nations EducationalScientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
  • hangzhou declaration

Panellists

Thursday, July 22, 2021

dc update 2016 2.1 2.2 1.3

in dc region ultra poor led by lindsay coates 1 2 - see also bigd shameran
oct 2016, time for action IFPRI, washington dc compact25 agenda
iowa is epicentre of world food prize- celebrating borlaug and those who apply him so that a great 20th c achievement appeared to be ending deadly famines except where places are at war, or dictatorship

SDgoal 2 food wash dc 1 2  - main UN operational branches rome - wfp, ifad

highlights from transcript, Fazle Abed, video oct 2016

I have worked on poverty alleviation over the last 40 years in Bangladesh and when catherine used to be the head World Food Program we worked on a program called vulnerable group development program working with the poorest 10% of bangladesh's population providing support through food rations for two years but then we found that most of these people who received the food rations didn't really improve themselves to a level where they could come out of poverty

02:57 So in Bangladesh we started a differently designed program in 2001 called targeting the ultra poor 1.3 -again the poorest ten per cent) but this time we provided support in terms of an asset transfer -perhaps 3 goats --we also provided them training/ hand-holding and we gave them a stipend for their children to go to school

-mainly women headed households in Bangladesh;  so we aimed to graduate them out of extreme poverty to a level of poverty where they can access market-based solutions  eg by becoming a microfinance borrower and over the years we have now graduated about 1.5 million families in Bangladesh

Back in 2005 a delegation from CGAP consultative , part of the world bank's ultra poor team came to Bangladesh- they looked at our program and said why don't we replicate this program in other countries so Ford Foundation and CGAP funded a program in 10 countries three in Asia including  India Pakistan and then Ethiopia Ghana Liberia then haiti honduras and peru 

so these countries were pilot projects modeled on the bangladesh/brac program and there were three research institutions the MIT poverty action lab,  the Dean Karlan at Yale School of Management and also London School of Economics they were hired to monitor the progress on these ten projects

 the london school of economics which has been looking at the brac program over the last 12 years

 and the other programs were looked on for about six years by these institutions and last year there

was a report by these research organizations and what was published in science magazine

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/348/6236/1260799   which came out with a very positive indicators

this involved randomized control trials so what we are hoping is that if this is the way to graduate very poorest of the poor people

various governments and donor agencies will take this up

07:34

the first country that is now interested in scaling up a large is the Kenyan government with the help of funding and implememtation by CARE and one other agency which brac will offer tech support to- this will be the first major project outside Bangladesh

and I' talked yesterday to the president of World Bank, jim kim, trying to get him to visit brac program

in Bangladesh when he goes there in a couple of weeks from now and hopefully also to

try and support if he's convinced , application in other countries 08:28 so we have found one way of tackling extreme poverty and hunger in Bangladesh;  the point about this particular program is that is the poor themselves who do all the hard work to get themselves out of poverty so

All we have donei is  create the enabling condition for them 



=======================================


Accelerating Progress in Ending Hunger and Undernutrition

OCT 6, 2016 - 04:15 PM TO 05:45 PM EDT

Welcome: Shenggen Fan, Director General, IFPRI  (Video)

Keynote: Kanayo Nwanze, President, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) (Video)

Perspectives:

ModeratorCatherine Bertini, Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University 

Discussion Video

Closing Remarks: Shenggen Fan, Director General, IFPRI (Video)

Blog recap: A Window of Opportunity to End Hunger and Undernutrition

Hunger and undernutrition persist as major global challenges, yet some countries have proven successful at rapidly reducing both. For example, Compact2025 focal countries—Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Malawi, and Rwanda—have each reduced the prevalence of hunger by roughly half from 1990 to 2015. In Peru, hunger rates fell by even more than half, from 32 percent to just 7.5 percent in the same period. Some countries have also made great strides to reduce undernutrition. Bangladesh reduced child stunting rates by 1.3 percent annually from 1997 to 2007—and then made accelerated reductions from 2011 to 2014 when stunting rates fell from 41 to 36 percent. Successes like these show that rapid progress is possible. How to sustain progress in these countries and accelerate progress in others are key questions that will be addressed in this special event convened by Compact2025.

Compact2025, a bold new initiative facilitated by IFPRI, aims to accelerate progress and scale up investments in ending hunger and malnutrition by 2025. Since its launch, the initiative has hosted country roundtables, released the book Nourishing Millions: Stories of Change in Nutrition, and is developing a Knowledge and Innovation hub, and much more.


Wednesday, July 21, 2021

 how and why did the new nation of bangladesh empower 90% of women to find their own partners to build community economies? 

and why/how did this new economic model network across a billion women 1972-2020?

a long answer to this question involves clicking through our 36 subsystems hu1.1-1.6 hu2.1-2.6 etc of abedmooc - 15 visits to bangladesh turned our notes into this pattern for you to click through if you choose - we have arranged 6 pieces for the first5 sdgs -poverty food health livelihood safe/ghappy community building 100% by/for all-  each from 1972 and with lower numbers representing first 25 years when a village meant no electricity, no communications with rest of nation other than person to person;

 or you can map back from now that bangladesh is desiigning leapfrog solutions often empowered by mobile phones and solar power - the last 6 pieces connect not just future of combating poverty but 2 more futures abed saw women as leading: growing middle class and going green as bangladesh plans to be 50% urban by 2050

the simplified answer - and please correct me if i get a detail wrong but note i am not interested in ideologies whether left right or from the moon! - i am a maths guy, i try and map piece by piece so that each builds each other

in most newly independent nations a powerful man and political party make choices like which foreign business to throw out and which to keep - this is not a simple question and is sometimes determined by bribes or better as a way of getting public funds possibly to serve all the people; often the new leader wants to serve the people but first must protect the nations borders by building an army and make some infrastructure decisions as well as choose if lands have all been legally distributed- there is so much to do that what doesnt get equal first attention is the rural most disconnected people from the capital's throne of power

-in bangladesh's case , the first 2 national leaders (one was assassinated) had to keep securing the borders from the war of independence- but there were hardly any business or citizens taxes - the best the government could do was start serving the 10% or urban peoples

so the rural peoples looked for partners- and by great good fortune: fazle as the nation's leading engineer- former regional ceo for shell oil - had started a pilot metavillage of 15000 homes, 100000 people whose homes had been flattened by war; mothers were dying of starvation, infants of dehydration ; he searched for solutions rest of world used, designed local microfranchises village mothers could turn into business- word of mouth spread- the same life saving solutions in the first metavillage were wanted by village mothers across the90% rural nation

fazle abed motivation was to serve -to end poverty, to raise life expectancy; indeed (BRA) Bangladesh Rural Advancement never sought to compete with the government just get on with doing empowered by village mothers

it happened that bangladesh had invented a new to the world health cure every tropical village wanted oral rehydration; unicef sent its people to understand how this work and show it to any village women - it happened by accident that of all the nations on the continent the chinese of 1972 had exactly the same famine and dehydration crises - and idea of women being as productive as men- the reason for women empowerment way have been different with one child per family half of all parents had to make sure girls were as producitve as boys; this started free knowhow swaps between bangladesh and chinese village networks - ultimately this is how a billion women collaborated across the asian continent ending the most extreme local poverty

as i say anything i write aims to be plain reporting with no ideolgical spin- this mooc aims to offer action learning the way it happened- nature has her own ways of valuing what truly works: in these cases womens networks were indeed largely guided by fitting in with nature which is why there could be at least partial lessons for anyone in the younger half of the world aiming to unite the first sustainability generation- 

that's up to you to interpret chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk washington dc region & sometimes Glasgow or an Asian country from which the world seems youth-motivated



3.4 1.1 1.2 transforming aid and last mile health - part 2 direct cash transfer- ie being best partner a global foundation could ever find for deep sdg collab


Abed billion womens webs decade 3/5: The 1990s also saw brac innovate world’s last mile village leadership in mitigating tuberculosis – trebling up on its microhealth services scaling of 3.1 oral rehydration, 3.3 continent-vaccination, as well as the most trusted 3.2 para-health networkers female communities have ever celebrated. It was through the tb solution that the 21st century started with 5 of global health’s influential Americans  Jim Kim, Paul Farmer, Bill and Melinda Gates, and George Soros became intergenerational partners of Fazle Abed. While not opened to 2004, the James Grant School of Public Health 4.6 (as first world class stage of brac university) became the first college branch of brac university 4.4/5.4 hosting world class summits- the identity of frugal last mile health practices (often hundreds of times more affordable as well as all that is practical without electricity became famous in such life shaping domains of health networking as mothers giving birth). Out of necessity most village mothers give birth at home. Brac merchandises a frugal birthing kit with all the essential tools a midwife needs for half a dollar.  

brac pioneered nationwide fight against tb from 1994 as documented here; at the turn of millennium jim kim followed by paul farmer, bill gates, george soros all discovered that brac had designed the most effective village method- this was one of the 2 main reasons such influential people both demanded brac go global and formed long lasting international partnerships 

fazle abed was due to talk at world bank's second tedx -sadly neither the second tedx occurred nor abed's remaining years to dec 2019 made that possible

who spoke at first tedx in tune with abed? 

on 3.4 village healthworker end tuberculosis across the indian subconrtinent shelly batra

Can we conquer tuberculosis - Dr. Shelly Batra - TEDxWBG. 3 views3 views. • Feb 16, 2020. 0. 0. Share. Save. 0 / 0. Sandeep Ahuja. Sandeep Ahuja.


on every way jim kim fazle abed bill gates george soros paul farmers networks converged jim kim


1.1 1.2 girlsworldbank.com - fazle abed's founding partners - see harvard professor chen's quiet revolution - started up a miracle during the 1970s - the world's poorest nation became a bottom up partnership lab instead of a top-trickle down dependent- this is how village women went from next to zero productivity to at least half of nation building - ironically because of the way that britain's independence partitioned hatred borders- solutions women might have empowered over 50 years across anywhere that electricity grids hadnt come to asian villages did not reach india pakistan ot mynamar but girl did it reach half a billion chinese women- the financing method as discussed in the economist 1977 - see the village loyalty program WORK POINTS - was NOT the same- british and dutch aid were happy to give billions of dollars in 20th cetury restituition as long as it was the most effective banking and livelihood education bangladesh women could build...

 but nobody with any link to human curiosity should be surprised that nature dealt continental asians the same life critical priority challenges in tropical regions cut off from 210 years of what smith and watt started up in glasgow


1.1 1.2
on what kim and latin americans called direct cash transfer  - ie what abed invented in 1972 as bottom up disaster relief agency who invited sponsoring partners to evaluate projects in real time and across decades
 of improvement - bangladesh rising , asia's two third of youth  rising - but transferred to context of mexico

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Marcelo shares his ...
Oct 20, 2014 · Uploaded by TEDx Talks