download one page tour to 50 years of building partners empowering Asian village women to end poverty, design last mile health service and much more- how brac became the ngo world's largest networking economy DAY I ALMOST CHOKED EATING SUSHI WITH FAZLE ABED; he was telling his story: Bangladesh was less than 1 year old- it was 1972 and wanting to do more that being young Asia's leading oil company ceo, his greatest mistake was spending his life savings on building homes for 100000 refugees. Being an engineer I knew how to do that. But as we were opening the meta-village a young lady came up to me : what education/village enterprises do we need to prevent dozens of girls starving every week and scores of infants dying from dehydration? So she & I learnt we needed to innovate 5 last mile services for any space girls are born- safe homes, education, health, food, finance; in searching we found a billion village mothers wanting to COLLAB. ..video 1
Download 2-page guide ...consider cases of new nations after world war 2- how many cases lived up to the peoples simplest dreams, end poverty, food/health/safety for every family member, education geared to decent jobs and happiness? bangladesh did something different- empowering 90% of women to find partners in building their own communities- .over 50 years a new economic model emerged which a billion asian women applied to end extreme poverty- how?.sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communitY 1 PLATFORMS 1 PLATFORMS 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
examples from abed builder of largest ngo partnership: Reeta Roy MCF 3.3 1billion$ to vaccinate continent africa 4.3 uganda; Soros 1.1-1.6 ineteconomics bottom-up, 4.4 new university OSUN 3.4 end TB; Gates 1.1-1.6 digital finance; 2.1-2.6 extending mpesa in tanzania's green revolution; world bank 1.3 first 100 ultra poor nations co-researchers, 4,4 first 100 nations early childhood play co-researchers
in contrast tu unicorns, we define hunicorns as billion dollar startup networks to valuable to human life for exiting investors or quarrelsome political parties -hall of fame first 1000 hunicorn collabs with sir fazle abed

36 alumni networks for sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communities 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
.
...2016 bangladesh e-digital schools nationwide :: bangla video:::: brookings video:: :::brac how did this happen?
The Economist 1977

2020s earthlings have the great good fortune that over 50 years from 1970 to 2019, fazle abed helped 1 billion asian women end poverty through 6 connected community building networks celebrating the first 5 sdgs and youth mediating everything else to be first sdg generation -each with a collaboration legacy -we're here to help yu find the network you can most help empower further
ending poverty, celebrating sustainability goals & youthful community building = most enjoyable ways to network; fazle abed (oil company engineer inspired by franciscan values) helped billion asian mothers do this over 50 years - join most exciting action learning networks and lets map AI algorithms = optimal livesmatter community builders -2021 join in glasgow cop26 & dubai rewired greatest youth meetings ever with thanks to abed.games youthmarkets.com & worldrecordjobs.com
xx

Which 30 educational and economic partnerships most empower a billion women to end extreme poverty, and value their children’s sustainability? Fortunately for those caring about sustainability 2020s, we can map this by around partners and alumni of 50 years of servant leadership by fazle abed 1970-2019 together with legacy specifications mapped through his final decade

Viewed from 1970, Increasing life expectancy from 25 years below to average helped gravitate development economics world’s most trusted partnership – hence sustainability last mile service markets

3) last mile health
2) agriculture for village food security


4)non-linear livelihood education
5) timing what platforms partners could facilitate entrepreneurial revolution not not just inclusive community but cooperation in full and meaningful entrepreneurial employment

financial entreprenurial revolution for nation's people history excluded from machine age


Tuesday, August 31, 2021

1.3 ultra poor keys

 https://bracupgi.org/

Shameran Abed- 1.3              Ultra Poor Graduation
We are witness to monumental human progress.
... Over the past few decades, the expansion of the global marketplace has lifted a third of the world's population out of extreme poverty.Yet we are also witness to an astounding failure.Our efforts to lift people up have left behind those in the harshest forms of poverty-the ultra-poor.

00:35

What it means to be ultra-poor goes beyond the monetary definition that we're all familiar with:living on less than two dollars a day.

It goes even beyond not having assets like livestock or land. To be ultra-poor means to be stripped of your dignity,purpose and self-worth.

It means living in isolation, because you're a burden to your own community. It means being unable to imagine a better future for yourself and your family.By the end of 2019, about 400 million people were living in ultra-poverty worldwide.That's more than the populations of the United States and Canada combined.

And when calamity strikes, whether it's a pandemic, a natural disaster or a manmade crisis, these numbers spike astronomically higher.

01:28

My father, Fazle Abed, gave up a corporate career to establish BRAC here in Bangladesh in 1972.

Bangladesh was a wreck, having just gone through a devastating cyclone followed by a brutal war for independence.

Working with the poorest of the poor, my father realized that poverty was more than the lack of income and assets. It was also a lack of hope. People were trapped in poverty, because they felt their condition was immutable. Poverty, to them, was like the sun and the moon --something given to them by God.For poverty reduction programs to succeed, they would need to instill hope and self-worth so that, with a little support, people could lift themselves out of poverty. BRAC went on to pioneer the graduation approach, a solution to ultra-poverty that addresses both income poverty and the poverty of hope.

02:27

The approach works primarily with women, because women are the most affected by ultra-poverty but also the ones most likely to pull themselves and their families out of it. Over a two-year period,we essentially do four things.

One, we meet a woman's basic needs by giving her food or cash, ensuring the minimum to survive.

Two, we move her towards a decent livelihood by giving her an asset, like livestock,and training her to earn money from it.

Three, we train her to save, budget and invest her new wealth.

And four, we help to integrate her socially, first into groups of women like her and then into her community.

 

Each of these elements is key to the success of the others, but the real magic is the hope and sense of possibility the women develop through the close mentorship they receive.

03:24

Let me tell you about Jorina.Jorina was born in a remote village in northern Bangladesh.She never went to school, and at the age of 15, she was married off to an abusive husband. He eventually abandoned her, leaving her with no income and two children who were not in school and were severely malnourished. With no one to turn to for help, she had no hope.

Jorina joined BRAC's Graduation program in 2005. She received a dollar a week, two cows, enterprise training

and a weekly visit from a mentor. She began to build her assets, but most importantly, she began to imagine a better future for herself and her children.

If you were visit Jorina's village today, you would find that she runs the largest general store in her area. She will proudly show you the land she bought and the house she built.

Since we began this program in 2002,two million Bangladeshi women have lifted themselves and their families out of ultra-poverty.That's almost nine million people.The program, which costs 500 dollars per household, runs for only two years,but the impact goes well beyond that.

04:40

Researchers at the London School of Economics found that even seven years after entering the program,

92 percent of participants had maintained or increased their income, assets and consumption.

Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee, the MIT economists who won the Nobel Prize last year (2019), led multicountry evaluations that identified graduation as one of the most effective ways to break the poverty trap.

But my father wasn't content to have found a solution that worked for some people. He always wanted to know whether we were being ambitious enough. in terms of scale. So when we achieved nationwide scale in Bangladesh, he wanted to know how we could scale it globally. And that has to involve governments.

Governments already dedicate billions of dollars on poverty reduction programs. But so much of that money is wasted, because these programs either don't reach the poorest, and even the ones that do fail to have significant long-term impact.

05.45

We are working to engage governments to help them to adopt and scale graduation programs themselves,

maximizing the impact of the billions of dollars they already allocate to fight ultra-poverty.

Our plan is to help another 21 million people lift themselves out of ultra-poverty in eight countries over the next six years with BRAC teams on-site and embedded in each country.

In July of 2019, my father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancerand given four months to live.

As he transitioned out of BRAC after leading the organization for 47 years, he reminded us that throughout his life, he saw optimism triumph over despair, that when you light the spark of self-belief in people, even the poorest can transform their lives.

My father passed away in December. 2019.He lit that spark for millions of people,and in the final days of his life, he implored us to continue to do so for millions more.

This opportunity is ours for the taking, sp let's stop imagining a world without ultra-poverty and start building that world together. Thank You.

We are witness to monumental human progress. Over the past few decades, the expansion of the global marketplace has lifted a third of the world's population out of extreme poverty.Yet we are also witness to an astounding failure.Our efforts to lift people up have left behind those in the harshest forms of poverty-the ultra-poor.

00:35

What it means to be ultra-poor goes beyond the monetary definition that we're all familiar with:living on less than two dollars a day.

It goes even beyond not having assets like livestock or land. To be ultra-poor means to be stripped of your dignity,purpose and self-worth.

It means living in isolation, because you're a burden to your own community. It means being unable to imagine a better future for yourself and your family.By the end of 2019, about 400 million people were living in ultra-poverty worldwide.That's more than the populations of the United States and Canada combined.

And when calamity strikes, whether it's a pandemic, a natural disaster or a manmade crisis, these numbers spike astronomically higher.

01:28

My father, Fazle Abed, gave up a corporate career to establish BRAC here in Bangladesh in 1972.

Bangladesh was a wreck, having just gone through a devastating cyclone followed by a brutal war for independence.

Working with the poorest of the poor, my father realized that poverty was more than the lack of income and assets. It was also a lack of hope. People were trapped in poverty, because they felt their condition was immutable. Poverty, to them, was like the sun and the moon --something given to them by God.For poverty reduction programs to succeed, they would need to instill hope and self-worth so that, with a little support, people could lift themselves out of poverty. BRAC went on to pioneer the graduation approach, a solution to ultra-poverty that addresses both income poverty and the poverty of hope.

02:27

The approach works primarily with women, because women are the most affected by ultra-poverty but also the ones most likely to pull themselves and their families out of it. Over a two-year period,we essentially do four things.

One, we meet a woman's basic needs by giving her food or cash, ensuring the minimum to survive.

Two, we move her towards a decent livelihood by giving her an asset, like livestock,and training her to earn money from it.

Three, we train her to save, budget and invest her new wealth.

And four, we help to integrate her socially, first into groups of women like her and then into her community.

Each of these elements is key to the success of the others, but the real magic is the hope and sense of possibility the women develop through the close mentorship they receive.

03:24

Let me tell you about Jorina.Jorina was born in a remote village in northern Bangladesh.She never went to school, and at the age of 15, she was married off to an abusive husband. He eventually abandoned her, leaving her with no income and two children who were not in school and were severely malnourished. With no one to turn to for help, she had no hope.

Jorina joined BRAC's Graduation program in 2005. She received a dollar a week, two cows, enterprise training

and a weekly visit from a mentor. She began to build her assets, but most importantly, she began to imagine a better future for herself and her children.

If you were visit Jorina's village today, you would find that she runs the largest general store in her area. She will proudly show you the land she bought and the house she built.

Since we began this program in 2002,two million Bangladeshi women have lifted themselves and their families out of ultra-poverty.That's almost nine million people.The program, which costs 500 dollars per household, runs for only two years,but the impact goes well beyond that.

04:40

Researchers at the London School of Economics found that even seven years after entering the program,

92 percent of participants had maintained or increased their income, assets and consumption.

Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee, the MIT economists who won the Nobel Prize last year (2019), led multicountry evaluations that identified graduation as one of the most effective ways to break the poverty trap.

But my father wasn't content to have found a solution that worked for some people. He always wanted to know whether we were being ambitious enough. in terms of scale. So when we achieved nationwide scale in Bangladesh, he wanted to know how we could scale it globally. And that has to involve governments.

Governments already dedicate billions of dollars on poverty reduction programs. But so much of that money is wasted, because these programs either don't reach the poorest, and even the ones that do fail to have significant long-term impact.

05.45

We are working to engage governments to help them to adopt and scale graduation programs themselves,

maximizing the impact of the billions of dollars they already allocate to fight ultra-poverty.

Our plan is to help another 21 million people lift themselves out of ultra-poverty in eight countries over the next six years with BRAC teams on-site and embedded in each country.

In July of 2019, my father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancerand given four months to live.

As he transitioned out of BRAC after leading the organization for 47 years, he reminded us that throughout his life, he saw optimism triumph over despair, that when you light the spark of self-belief in people, even the poorest can transform their lives.

My father passed away in December. 2019.He lit that spark for millions of people,and in the final days of his life, he implored us to continue to do so for millions more.

This opportunity is ours for the taking, so let's stop imagining a world without ultra-poverty and start building that world together. Thank You.

--------------------------------------

related background research ultra poor at brac's institutional depository 

Saturday, August 28, 2021

3.2 updates on doordash for health

few black holes in economics more urgently need filling than how village mothers built rural nations health service

one of brac's earliest inventions was a microfranchise enabling a village mother to make positive cashflow from weekly visits to village homes offering basic health products -each para health worker was assigned 300 homes- over years she became these microcommunities most trusted connectors with all rural advances in health 

  2021 update on this 40 year movement for last mile community health

movement features in 10 intercountry comparisons of community health


Thursday, August 19, 2021

*4


young journalists and i visited bangladesh 15 times during fazle abed's lasr decade+-acrually 2007-19 

we became convinced that youth as first sustainability generation would be easy if only there were more people like fazle abed- we have the tech and human brains to beat covid, to align with nature, to love children..

we've catalogued 36 ways - 6 dimensions by 6 times - over sir fazles last 50 year action learning networking when different resources connected to help the poorest mothers in the world build the rural nation of bangladesh and to celebrate anyone who helped them (footnote 1);  to get to know abed from his alumni , investors and others who love the goal that wherever the next girl (or boy is born) she's has a happy and great chance at life

education is the way that excites us mst becausethe way abed saw life everyone's both a student (and skills teachers as parent or community servant)
four education dimensions connect typical student age- 
    from leaflet starting abed's last of 5 decades 2010s

..footnote 5.2 bangladesh mothers most amazing supporters- get out map of continent asia 1971 - can you see why chinese village mothers faced similar life-shaping challenges?- back in 1971 bangladesh was the porrest 75 million person nation and china the poorest 750 million person nation- and both countries peoples came to the conclusion that only female productivity could collaboratively save their space on the planet- last mile health livelihoods, last mile food livelihoods, last mile financing, last mile education -all became a billion womens challenge to entreprenurially solve...
=======
playschool summer tour 2021- related web - twitter  linkedin
We are on a journey to redefine play and reimagine learning. Because play is how children learn best.
MORE LEGO EDU TWITTERS - VENTURES IN EDU
x
https://www.brac.net/program/education/

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

3.5 partners -affordable-health frugal - brac delivery kit child birth, child stunting, wash ... bottom of pyramid market leadership microhealth, microagri ....

PARTNERS IN AFFORDABLE HEALTH what i have learnt from 15 trips to bangladesh and more broadly from 50 to asia is sustainability will most likely depend on celebrating those who empower health networks around love not those who power over health with money -happy to zoom or debate cases on this any time rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

frugal is the terminology brac celebrates in innovating health and well being services in life critical ways but on minimal budgets- brac's doubling of network services every 2.5 years emerged as south/east partnering centre of gravity 10 years ahead of western bottom of pyramid studies -eg gary hamel , and 3.2 the building of the microfranchise of women health suppliers goes back to start of brac early 1970s 

we find searches of brac delivery kits first produced 1998 offer a range of reports and academic inputs illustrating brac's longitudinal work and increasing centre of gravity for frugal partnerships 


In the developing world, life often runs on jugaad solutions. According to the authors of Jugaad Innovation: Think Frugal, Be Flexible, Generate Breakthrough Growth, western businesses could learn a lot from the jugaad approach of innovation and radical affordability.

Development organizations, too, must create inexpensive and adaptable solutions to alleviate poverty. The BRAC birthing kit is one such example.

BRAC has grappled with the problem of high maternal and infant mortality in a country where the vast majority of women still give birth at home without a skilled attendant. Your response might be to build more or bigger hospitals; BRAC instead brought suitable alternatives to the women themselves, in the form of “birthing huts” in the slums of Dhaka and other Bangladeshi cities, as well as the BRAC birthing kits.

A BRAC birthing kit contains the necessary tools for a safe and sterile delivery: gauze, carbolic soap, a sterile plastic sheet to go over the mattress, a thread to tie the umbilical cord and a surgical blade to cut it. That’s it.

It might not be the most elegant solution, but it transforms any home into a safe and sterile place to have a baby. The cost to the consumer? A mere 40 cents.

By slimming the product down to the bare necessities, the birthing kit is simple to manufacture and distribute. At the Sanitary Napkin and Delivery Kits unit, a BRAC social enterprise, the kit costs 28 cents to make. It is then sold to BRAC’s Health Program for 32 cents, the same price at which it is sold to BRAC community health promoters, or shasthya shebikas in Bengali. These women are trained by BRAC and, as part of a range of products and services they provide, sell the kits for 40 cents to their community.

Since 1999, BRAC has manufactured more than 2.6 million of these.

Of course, it’s not enough to only have a birthing kit. A skilled attendant is still necessary to manage complications. You might think it’s time to send in the doctors, but BRAC learned that with a bit of training – and access to a network of qualified help should complications arise – women from the community can be trained to be skilled birth attendants.

BRAC has made headway in frugal innovation by providing products and services that are affordable, accessible, and – crucially – relevant to those being served. BRAC has already seen measurable results; meanwhile Bangladesh is well on its way to reducing maternal and child mortality by the 2015 deadline of the UN Millennium Development Goals.


this journal paper written 2003 clarifies work brac had been doing for a decade

upsated examples 

The Manoshi Project at BRAC provides community-based maternal, neonatal and child health services for 6.9 million urban slum dwellers in 10 cities in Bangladesh. At the time of the project’s inception in 2007, this population had high maternal and neonatal mortality. The first brac maternal delivery kits started production in 1998  and became incorporated in the enterprise that also manufactures sanitary towels from 2007

2 hours in 3-part dvd series on fazle abed/brac published 2006 by jeff skoll with ashoka

the 2005 pbs television series rx for survival featured sit fazle abed and brac prominently  - we have footnoted the group of 15 global health champions the way pbs profiled them

- brac became increasingly celebrated (by gates foundation, soros foundation, jim kim and paul farmers pih) for global health innovations through decade 2002-12 (more recent frugal summaries as brac host annual forums - youtube example

=============================================

pbs global health champions 2005

During production for Rx for Survival, we encountered a great number of individuals making a tremendous difference on the front lines of global health. Some work in remote rural communities; others create national or international public health initiatives. The following profiles of these global health champions are but a small sample of the many fine people, past and present, who have made public health their life's work.


Fazle Hasan Abed

Fazle Hasan Abed

Founder and Chairperson
BRAC (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee)


As leader of one of the most effective non-governmental organizations in the world, Abed has fought against poverty, disease, child mortality, and illiteracy by educating and empowering the poor women of rural Bangladesh.

Uche Amazigo

Uche Amazigo, PhD

World Health Organization, African Program for Onchocerciasis Control


River blindness, a condition caused by worms that damage the eyes to the point of blindness, affects 12 African nations. With determination and diplomacy, Amazigo has implemented a low-cost, sustainable strategy to distribute a medicine that may eradicate this disease.

Andrea ColemanBarry Coleman

Andrea and Barry Coleman

Co-Founders
Riders for Health


Their shared love of motorcycles inspired a marriage and the founding of an organization that provides African health care workers with motorcycles to transport patients and deliver medical supplies.

Ernest Darkoh

Ernest Darkoh, MD, MPH, MBA

Chairman and Founding Partner, BroadReach
Former Operations Manager, Botswana's Treatment Program for HIV/AIDS


Darkoh is building a nationwide health system from the ground up in Botswana through a public-private collaboration between the government of the small African nation and foundations.

Paul Farmer

Paul Farmer, MD, PhD

Founding Director
Partners in Health


He has been described as "a man who would cure the world." Trained as a medical anthropologist and physician, the Robin Hood of global health has begged, borrowed, and stolen AIDS drugs to treat the poor in Haiti.

William H. Foege

William H. Foege, MD

Professor and Health Policy Fellow, Emory University
Former Head, CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


In the 1970s he led the smallpox eradication campaign in India and later persuaded governments and drug companies to support polio eradication efforts. Today he is on the front lines of the battle to overcome the public's resistance to the use of vaccines.

Donald R. Hopkins

Donald R. Hopkins, MD, MPH

Associate Executive Director
The Carter Center


For a long time, Hopkins was alone in his belief that Guinea worm disease could be eradicated. Through worldwide campaigns and community mobilization efforts, he now stands on the brink of its worldwide eradication.

Dr. Jim Yong Kim

Jim Yong Kim, MD, PhD

Co-Founder, Partners in Health
Director of HIV/AIDS, World Health Organization


Supported in part by a MacArthur Foundation genius grant he received in 2003, Kim is on his way to achieving an ambitious goal: to get three million AIDS patients worldwide onto antiretroviral drugs by the end of 2005.

Rohima

Rohima

Volunteer
BRAC Community Health


A grassroots community health worker, Rohima never finished primary school, but today she monitors the health of 300 households in Bangladesh. She is among 33,000 women who have taken charge of their families' health and started microfinanced businesses.

Remko SchatsLina Gustin

Remko Schats, MD and Lina Gustin, RN

Doctors Without Borders

 


This physician and nurse team treat 17,000 people in a refugee camp in western Chad. During their six-month mission they will deal with the threat of measles, poor sanitation, armed bandits, and Sudanese militias.

Dr. Jaime Sepulveda

Jaime Sepulveda Amor, PhD

Director General
Mexican National Institutes of Health


Presented with a possible cholera epidemic, Sepulveda launched a massive clean-water program in Mexico, with an aggressive communications campaign to alert people to the ways the disease is transmitted.

Alfred Sommer

Alfred Sommer, MD, MHS

Dean Emeritus and Professor
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Sommer discovered that children in Indonesia were dying of complications from nightblindness, a condition arising from vitamin A deficiency. His findings and identification of an inexpensive cure have dramatically reduced childhood mortality.

Mechai Viravaidya

Mechai Viravaidya

Founder and Board Chairman
The Population & Community Development Association


With humor and determination, Viravaidya has fought for family planning and safe sex in Thailand. Known as "the condom king," his effort to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS in Thailand has been remarkably successful.

=================================

ck prahalad's classic the fortune at the bottom of the pyramid -eradicating poverty through profits was published in 2005 but must have taken several years to assemble

-its major cases came from india peru brazil mexico venezuela

main health cases were india's aravind eye care and india's prosthetic jaipur footand india's annapurna salt which targets solutions to idd iodine deficiency disorder; india's hindustan  lever targeting of soap markets towards mitigation of diarrheal diseases 

peru voxiva tech for early detection of infectious diseases  

Tuesday, August 17, 2021

3.6, 3.1 2.1 2.2 iccdr,b jpgsph 60+years cholera lab james grant brac fazle abed

 ICDDR,B = International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh=oral rehydration alumni core multiplier of 1 billion women rural Keynesianism

https://twitter.com/icddr_b  (current influencers cholera vaccine  supporters sida brits canadians )

its hard to see how a billion rural women would have ended extreme poverty without the alumni of the cholera lab now known as iccdr,b and of borlaug's green revolution where local rice production was found to vary 10-fold by depth of adaptation of ride seed to local conditions - see note filed in the economist 1977 as the happiest chart in the world

while research at iccdr.b is more than 10 years older than the nation of bangladesh  as the institute was founded in east pakistan - the challenge of how to market a virtually free cure  to diarrhea which once killed a third of infants in tropical villages requires understanding the roles of fazle abed, james grant, chinese american friends in the late 1970s and later friends across india- probably no medicical intervention has been open sourced more COLLABoratively than the cholera lab's oral rehydration and those who scaled the most life saving results always asked for the collaboration and the empowerment by and for village women to be the main credit

this 2012 note on the celebration of brac university's james grant school of public health makings its home the iccdrb.b campus from 2012 typifies celebrating every parent who ends poverty not individual inventrs, and dec 2021's next summit hosted by iccdr,b typifies how great collabs attract the greatest sdg partners beyond borders

 09 MAY 2012

Over 250 guests gathered at icddr,b’s Mohakhali campus on Tuesday, 8 May to mark the official opening of the James P. Grant School of Public Health’s new premises, which are housed within icddr,b’s main building. With seven classrooms, 10 breakout tutorial rooms and a 40-student capacity computer lab, the opening of new space is a major step forward for the public health school and its flagship Masters in Public Health programme, which attracts students from around the world. 

Honouring James P. Grant

The James P. Grant School of Public Health at BRAC University was established in 2004 with extensive support from icddr,b and BRAC. The school’s name honours the late James P. Grant, a former Executive Director of UNICEF, who led a major campaign to prevent the deaths of children from easily preventable diseases. In 2008, journalist Nicholas D. Kristof described Grant as "a little-known American aid worker (who) probably saved more lives than were destroyed by Hitler, Mao, and Stalin combined" through his promotion of vaccinations and diarrhea treatments.

A collaborative effort

For several years now, icddr,b has provided essential support to JPGSPH; not only in terms of sharing faculty expertise, but also by giving JPGSPH students access to its research and field site facilities. Students also benefit from access to icddr,b’s state-of-the-art laboratories and its extensive library. JPGSPH’s impact on public health was recognised by the bulletin of the World Health Organization in 2007 when it was selected as one of six of the world’s most effective institutions for promoting innovative higher public health education. This achievement is undoubtedly also testimony to the high level of support provided by its institutional partners.

Inauguration ceremony

At Tuesday’s event, icddr,b’s Executive Director, Dr. Alejandro Cravioto highlighted the benefits that icddr,b and BRAC University’s joint venture will deliver, such as the emergence of new research links in the field of public health. “This joint venture creates the opportunity for icddr,b’s researchers to share and disseminate their extensive knowledge in research and experiences in public health through their teaching at the JPGSPH,” he said. “This knowledge can be transmitted worldwide.”

JPGSPH’s Dean Dr. Timothy G. Evans commented on the school’s rapid growth. In his opening remarks he noted that, “we started with one classroom with a maximum capacity of 30 students. From today, we have new premises and the capacity to accommodate over 300 students at any time.” BRAC University’s Vice Chancellor, Dr. Ainun Nishat, congratulated JPGSPH on the occasion and stated how he is looking forward to deepening relationships between partner institutions. BRAC’s Founder and Chairperson Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, KCMG, the event’s chief guest, stated that he was sure that “this collaboration will be fruitful, as well as mutually beneficial, to both icddr,b and JPGSPH.”

The inauguration ceremony was followed by a reception and tour of the school’s new premises.

For further details please contact:

Nasmeen Ahmed 2012

=========================

2021 conference with india

https://www.icddrb.org/news-and-events/events/event/552-Delivering%20for%20Nutrition%20Conference

Conference on Delivering for Nutrition in South Asia

Hosted by: A consortium of co-hosts from around South Asia

Date: 01 December 2021 09:00 to 02 December 2021 21:00

Location: Online

https://poshan.ifpri.info/delivering-for-nutrition-in-south-asia-call-for-abstract/

COVID-19 has disrupted health systems, nutrition services, and food systems around the world, including South Asia.  Research-based evidence and programmatic experiences are essential to support stakeholders to restore services and re-orient programs and policies to support better nutrition outcomes.
We, a consortium of co-hosts from around South Asia, are pleased to announce a virtual conference on ‘Delivering for Nutrition (D4N) in South Asia: Implementation Research in the Context of COVID-19’ on December 1-2, 2021. D4N 2021 aims to bring together evidence that can inform and support policy and program initiatives in South Asia to prioritize and improve maternal and child nutrition during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.
With this overarching purpose, the key objectives are to:
- Share evidence of the impact of COVID-19 on maternal and child nutrition
- Highlight adaptations to support implementation of health and nutrition interventions and social safety net programs
- Identify lessons learned from implementing programs to support maternal and child nutrition during the pandemic

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timeline update 2018

icddr,b Timeline

2018Prince Mahidol Award 2018 to icddr,b scientists for oral cholera vaccine (OCV) development

2017: Humanitarian response to Forcibly Displaced Myanmar Nationals in Rohingya camps

2017: icddr,b wins Conrad N Hilton Humanitarian Prize

2016: UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon endorses icddr,b

2016: Charles C Shepard science award given to icddr,b scientist

2016: Single OCV dose protective in endemic setting – finding in New England Journal of Medicine

2015Ultra low-cost bubble-CPAP for treatment of severe pneumonia and hypoxemia in children

2015: Ready-to-use supplementary and therapeutic food (RUTF) to prevent and treat childhood malnutrition

2015Piloting breast milk pasteurisation to enable readymade garment workers breastfeed at work

2014: OCV impact found substantial through Bangladesh’s existing immunisation infrastructure

2014: Gut microbial communities shown to significantly influence recovery from malnutrition

2013The Lancet lauds icddr,b’s contributions in improved health in Bangladesh

2011: First US Patent 7638271 for inventing a new tuberculosis diagnostic method

2011: ‘Continuum of Care’ approach achieves 36% drop in perinatal mortality

2010: Gender violence research feeds into Bangladesh’s Domestic Violence Act

2010: Rotavirus vaccine trial: Key findings in The Lancet

2010: Clean delivery kit & icddr,b birthing-mat to identify women at risk of postpartum haemorrhage

2008: Projahnmo project reports 34% reduction in neonatal mortality in The Lancet

2008: Influenza vaccine cut illness by 63% in infants <6 months; averted one-third of all febrile respiratory illnesses

2005: Independence Day Award, Bangladesh’s most prestigious award

2002: Zinc treatment of diarrhoea found to reduce <5 mortality by 50%

2001: Gates Award for Global Health for development of Oral Rehydration Solution (ORS)

2000: Assisted Government of Bangladesh with control of major dengue epidemic in Dhaka

1999: Management of severely malnourished children cut to less than 5%

1998: HIV sero-surveillance begins on behalf of Government of Bangladesh

1995: Maternal immunisation with pneumococcal vaccine shown to protect newborns

1993: New Vibrio cholerae 0139 (Bengal strain) identified and characterised

1985: First field trial of oral cholera vaccine launched

1982: Matlab Maternal Child Health and Family Planning project achieves major drop in fertility rates

1980: Tetanus toxoid vaccination of mothers found to reduce neonatal mortality by 75%

1978: Introduction of use of sucrose (table sugar) or unrefined brown sugar (gur) to replace glucose in ORS

1978: Rotavirus identified as most common cause of diarrhoea in infants - highest priority for new vaccines

1978: icddr,b formally established

1968: First successful trials of ORS result published in The Lancet

1966: Cholera fatality reduced to less than 1%

1963: The world’s longest-running health and demographic surveillance (HDSS) starts in Matlab, Chandpur

1962: Dhaka Hospital established

1960: Cholera Research Laboratory (CRL), forerunner of icddr,b, launches in Dhaka


icddr,b research is supported by a combination of core support from bilateral donors and grant income. In 2017, the top 10 revenue sources for restricted and unrestricted grants were:

1) Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USA
2) UKAID: Department for International Development (DFID)
3) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA
4) United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
5) The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
6) National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA
7) Government of the People's Republic of Bangladesh
8) Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA)
9) Commission of the European Communities
10) Global Affairs Canada (GAC), Government of Canada

 

icddr,b is grateful to the Government of Bangladesh for its long-term financial support. icddr,b is also grateful to its international core donors, Canada (Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development), Sweden (Sida), and the United Kingdom (DFID). In keeping with the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness, they provide long-term core funds to support the advancement of icddr,b's strategic plan.

Representatives from each of the development agencies meet regularly with icddr,b to monitor progress and discuss emerging research priorities and outputs. Every year, icddr,b reports performance against an agreed log frame and a joint donor report is commissioned to monitor progress.

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2012 beijing co-launch global health

https://twitter.com/BRACJPGSPH  recommended list health systems global

beijing 2012 programme delegates webpage




History

icddr,b was established in Dhaka in 1960s as the South-East Asia Treaty Organisation (SEATO) Cholera Research Laboratory. 

The Cholera Research Laboratory (CRL) soon developed an international reputation in diarrhoeal disease research. Among its notable early achievements was a key role in the development, testing and implementation of oral rehydration solution (ORS) – a treatment estimated to have saved tens of millions of lives worldwide.

During the 1960s, the CRL also established a large-scale health and demographic surveillance site at Matlab – now the longest-running such site in the global South and an inspiration for many similar sites worldwide.

In 1962, the CRL established the Dhaka Hospital, still run by icddr,b, to meet the urgent need to treat patients, particularly young children, with severe diarrhoeal disease. The Dhaka Hospital has developed into a nationally important treatment centre and provides an infrastructure for an extensive programme of clinical research. Clinical services were also introduced at Matlab Hospital.

As many other factors affect the risk of diarrhoeal diseases or recovery from them – including nutritional status, income, education of mothers, access to clean water, sanitation habits and efficacy of vaccines – research at CRL expanded into new areas of public health. However, it retained its primary focus on evidence-based solutions able to deliver significant public health benefits at low cost to those living in poverty. 

From CRL to icddr,b

In 1978, the CRL received fresh impetus and a new name – the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh. In recent years, we have been known simply as icddr,b.