Join in celebrating the 30 most productive collaborations 2020-1970 of women empowered sustainability generation goals 1 -5 and help log advances to 2025 Fazle Abed partners and 1billion girls mapped these 30 collaborations -six each for education , health, food/land, finance to end poverty, societal platforms for partners in 100% community (women as productive as men, young & old, colored & white
education opportunities 4.1 adult skills; 4.2 primary; 4.3 teen ; 4.4 university; 4.5 pre-school ;4.6 multidisciplinary education luminaries health opportunities
3.1 oral rehydration 3.2 para health "doordash" basic medicines 3.3 scale vaccination 3.4 tuberculosis 3.5 Frugal processes eg wash sanitation, maternity; 3.6 James Grant School of public health food/land opportunities
2.1 rice 2.2 veggie 2.3 cash crops & village fair2.4 poultry 2.5 dairy, 2.6 14 nation leading supply chains financial opportunities to end poverty
1.1 change aid (sustainable charity), microfinance+, 1.3 ultra poor, 1.4 city bank 1.5 bkash, 1.6 hq2 brac intl netherlands
platforms for 100% lives matter community (women as productive as men , all skin cols equal opportunity etc)
5.1 100k person metavillage; 1 billion asian women, brac net, 5.4 100 asian universities share sdg graduates 5.5 climate smart village exchanges, 5.6 zoom me up scotty: adamsmith.app 2022: year 264 in search of moral market leadership

Monday, June 21, 2021

3.3 vaccination urgent continent scale

scaling continent-wide vaccination was a key challege in 1980s as it is again with 2020s coved decade

what can we learn from 1980

In 1974 member states of the World Health Organization (WH O) had passed a resolution to bring vaccines to children across the globe. At the Alma Ata Conference in 1978 they had set a concrete goal of immunizing 80 percent of the world’s children against common childhood diseases by1990. But by 1984, after climbing from 5 percent to 20 percent, immunization coverage had leveled off. By 1990 it has reached 80%- 

almost everyone agrees the core collaborator in this was unicef's leader james grant who came from a missionary family who had served in china. there is agreement the most urgent collaboration networking in history took place. not everyone agrees-

 was it because big american funders came together or because women empowerment networks starting in bangladesh and china were empowered -and loved - to do it. probably both are true but we focus on the empowered networking...

after being inspired by success of brac nationally scale bangladesh delivery partnership of 3.1 oral rehydration, james grant asked fazle abed - do you have one other network priority? - vaccinate the nation/continent was abed's demand from early 1980s ... related noted when brac opened brac university its lead college = james grant school of public health - which turns summits/MAs on frugal medical solutions into worldwide movements

3.3 vaccination continents

lead 2021 africa reeta roy mastercard foundation - see bloomberg qatar summit

8

reeta is also abed's deepest african partner on 4,3 teen girls liveihoods clubs- thanks to decade of support uganda now world showcase on that

related talk moderna partner -2022 aims at 3 bn next year; pfifer too; probably capacity 15 bn in 2022

Noubar Afeyan

Founder and CEO
Flagship Pioneering

afeyan - cofounder moderna - also chase up story original patent sciest of mra couldnt find us buyer- whence moderna out of europe..we spend too much on sick care not hunting out diseases and solution intervemtions- think of health as security not just care- medicine preemptively, collaboratively- our current reimbursement systems encourage waiting for disease and then spending a not

flabship platform for bio companies - thats how we [lanted moderna 10 years ago

-we hope to work on early detection - eg cancer... and for infectios diseases ai machine learning to track ahead, and so prevent

can we change regulatory process so fast collaboration in designing vaccinations to 1 year instead of 5 year becomes norms

mcard foundation commitment 75% partners in africa- mcard foundation lead brc partner uganda girls clubs skils apprentices 4.3


The Future of Vaccines in Africa

In a groundbreaking public-private partnership, Africa CDC is teaming up with the Mastercard Foundation to produce its own vaccines. We get the details from the two key people involved in inking this unique deal.

In conversation with Zain Verjee, Host and Executive Producer, Qatar Economic Forum

  • John Nkengasong, Director, Africa CDC
  • Reeta Roy, President and CEO, Mastercard Foundation

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SpeakerSpeakerSpeaker


A thoughtful leader and an advocate for the world’s most vulnerable, Reeta has worked tirelessly to build a foundation that is collaborative and known for its lasting impact.

Today, the Mastercard Foundation is one of the largest private foundations in the world. Its vision is a world where everyone has the opportunity to learn and prosper. Under Reeta’s leadership, the Foundation has focused its work on Africa and committed more than US$2.6 billion to advance education and financial inclusion. Its programs have improved the lives of more than 33 million people and their families.

A strong believer in listening, Reeta can often be found in the field, working directly with the people whom the Foundation’s programs serve.

Reeta’s childhood growing up in Malaysia helped her to develop her capacity to listen and the empathy with which she approaches the Foundation’s work. Reeta was a beneficiary of scholarships that allowed her to complete her education and mentors continue to support her growth as a leader.

Reeta is a member of the African Transformation Leadership Panel and is regularly called upon by the United Nations and regional bodies in Africa such as the African Center for Economic Transformation to advocate for solutions for youth employment. Reeta has represented these ideas on numerous stages, including the African Transformation Forum and World Bank Group Meetings.

Prior to joining the Foundation, Reeta was the Divisional Vice President of Global Citizenship and Policy at Abbott and was Vice President of the Abbott Fund, its corporate foundation. She led Abbott’s public-private initiatives related to HIV/AIDS in Africa and a range of global health programs. Before Abbott, Reeta held a number of leadership positions at Bristol-Myers Squibb, working on global health policy issues. Prior to joining the private sector, she worked at the United Nations.

Reeta received a Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and a Bachelor of Arts from St. Andrews Presbyterian College.

She holds seven Honorary Doctorate degrees from institutions including EARTH University, McGill University, University of Toronto, American University of Beirut, and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). She has received several awards, including the Distinguished Achievement Award from Tufts University, the C3 Women Empowerment Achievement Award, the Class of 1947 Memorial Award from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, and the Women of Distinction Award from YWCA Toronto. During Reeta’s tenure, the Foundation has also been recognized with a number of awards, including the Canadian Council for the Advancement of Education’s Friend of Education Award, the Global Education Award of the World Affairs Council, the Women’s Leadership Award from Opportunity International, and the Global Foundation for Peace Award from International House at Berkeley.


x has moved head office of mcf from canada to african continent

Dr. John Nkengasong

Director
Africa CDC

Back

Dr John Nkengasong currently serves as Director for the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Earlier this year, he was appointed as one of the WHO Director-General’s Special Envoys on COVID-19 Preparedness and Response, and most recently was awarded the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s 2020 Global Goalkeeper Award for his contributions to the continental response in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic in Africa.

Prior to his current position, he served as Deputy Principal Director (acting) of the Center for Global Health, United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC), and Chief of the International Laboratory Branch, Division of Global HIV and TB, US CDC.

Dr Nkengasong holds a Masters in Tropical Biomedical Science from the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium, and a Doctorate in Medical Sciences (Virology) from the University of Brussels, Belgium.

Dr Nkengasong has received numerous awards for his work including Sheppard Award, the William Watson Medal of Excellence, the highest recognition awarded by CDC. He is also recipient of the Knight of Honour Medal by the Government of Cote d’Ivoire, was knighted in 2017 as the Officer of Loin by the President of Senegal, H.E. Macky Sall, and Knighted in November 2018 by the government of Cameroon for his significant contributions to public health. He is an adjunct professor at the Emory School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA.  He serves on several international advisory boards including the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Initiative – CEPI, the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) among others. He has authored over 250 peer-review articles in international journals and published several book chapters.

x

Zain Verjee

Host and Executive Producer
Qatar Economic Forum

Back

Zain Verjee is one of the world’s most respected and recognized journalists, with an action-packed background and experience as a storyteller, entrepreneur, communicator, and interviewer. She is well known as a former CNN anchor and correspondent, and has made a successful transition into the world of communications and creative entrepreneurship.

During the Coronavirus pandemic, she created covidHQafrica.com in partnership with MasterCard Foundation, which is a storytelling, data and information site for Africa. 

Her communications firm, Zain Verjee Group, has worked with a deep lineup of organizations and entities such as Bloomberg Media, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Pfizer Inc., Equity Group Foundation of Kenya, the GAVI Vaccine Alliance, the World Health Organization, General Electric Africa, Morocco’s OCP, The Aga Khan Development Network, the African Development Bank and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa on their communications and public relations delivery and strategies via advisory, consulting, and content production. She is a highly sought after facilitator and interviewer, and has spoken on platforms such as TED and Africa House.  She is a senior fellow (non-resident) at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Africa Program.  She is a guest opinion columnist on African issues for The National, UAE.

Zain is also a startup founder and content creator, co-founding aKoma Media, a continental network of workspaces for Africa’s creative and cultural economy, in 2015. Her other ventures in the creative space include Amplify, a content creator fellowship with participants from East/West Africa and the US, in partnership with MasterCard Foundation. In addition, with her former colleague and CNN anchor Isha Sesay, Zain launched Rouse, an immersive three day gathering event for a community of women in Africa and the diaspora in 2019. Zain is a key member to the media advisory committee for Africa No Filter, and also Board Chair for the Kenya-based conservation organization, Wildlife Direct. 

Zain resides in the Los Angeles area and Nairobi, Kenya. Her versatility and charisma have been a great asset for her in her post anchor life and entrepreneurial ventures. She enjoys creative writing, swimming butterfly, riding horses and is currently training for a half marathon.


xZain Verjee is one of the world’s most respected and recognized journalists, with an action-packed background and experience as a storyteller, entrepreneur, communicator, and interviewer. She is well known as a former CNN anchor and correspondent, and has made a successful transition into the world of communications and creative entrepreneurship.

During the Coronavirus pandemic, she created covidHQafrica.com in partnership with MasterCard Foundation, which is a storytelling, data and information site for Africa. 

Her communications firm, Zain Verjee Group, has worked with a deep lineup of organizations and entities such as Bloomberg Media, Bloomberg Philanthropies, Pfizer Inc., Equity Group Foundation of Kenya, the GAVI Vaccine Alliance, the World Health Organization, General Electric Africa, Morocco’s OCP, The Aga Khan Development Network, the African Development Bank and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa on their communications and public relations delivery and strategies via advisory, consulting, and content production. She is a highly sought after facilitator and interviewer, and has spoken on platforms such as TED and Africa House.  She is a senior fellow (non-resident) at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, Africa Program.  She is a guest opinion columnist on African issues for The National, UAE.

Zain is also a startup founder and content creator, co-founding aKoma Media, a continental network of workspaces for Africa’s creative and cultural economy, in 2015. Her other ventures in the creative space include Amplify, a content creator fellowship with participants from East/West Africa and the US, in partnership with MasterCard Foundation. In addition, with her former colleague and CNN anchor Isha Sesay, Zain launched Rouse, an immersive three day gathering event for a community of women in Africa and the diaspora in 2019. Zain is a key member to the media advisory committee for Africa No Filter, and also Board Chair for the Kenya-based conservation organization, Wildlife Direct. 

Zain resides in the Los Angeles area and Nairobi, Kenya. Her versatility and charisma have been a great asset for her in her post anchor life and entrepreneurial ventures. She enjoys creative writing, swimming butterfly, riding horses and is currently training for a half marathon.

xAction learning curves/networks to vaccinate scaling continents
we can look at mid 1980s partners around brac, unicef and chinese barefoot medics

(some may want to add harvard anthropologists partnes in health around farmer and jim kim also started in 1985 - though its first 15 years were about depth of exchanges - eg connecting harvard grads with haiti or peru; jim kim became central to chamioning global fund particularly solutions to the combination of tb and aids from about 2000 but not continent vaccination per se 

\or we can start as millennium goals were agreed around 2002 which gavi says it was preparing for from 2000



1 comment:

  1. The results are in: Covid-19 has led to sharply reduced learning gains; widening racial disparities in achievement; and a rise of mental-health afflictions among stuck-at-home students. As children return to school, countries need to ensure that both girls and boys re-engage with the learning process to future-proof global recovery efforts. We chart the way forward.

    In conversation with Scarlet Fu, Anchor, Bloomberg Television

    Baroness Valerie Amos, Master of University College, University of Oxford
    Louise Mushikiwabo, Secretary General, Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie

    ReplyDelete