DAY I ALMOST CHOKED EATING SUSHI WITH FAZLE ABED; he was telling the story- my greatest mistake was spending my life savings on building homes for 100000 refugees. Being an engineer I knew how to do that. But as we were opening the meta-village a young lady came up to me : what education/enterprises do we need to prevent dozens of girls dying every week? So she & I learnt we needed to innovate 5 last mile services for any space girls are born- safe homes, education, health, food, finance; in searching we soon found a billion village mothers wanting to COLLAB. ..mothers 1
Download 2-page guide ...consider cases of new nations after world war 2- how many cases lived up to the peoples simplest dreams, end poverty, food/health/safety for every family member, education geared to decent jobs and happiness? bangladesh did something different- empowering 90% of women to find partners in building their own communities- .over 50 years a new economic model emerged which a billion asian women applied to end extreme poverty- how?.sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communitY 1 PLATFORMS 1 PLATFORMS 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
examples from abed builder of largest ngo partnership: Reeta Roy MCF 3.3 1billion$ to vaccinate continent africa 4.3 uganda; Soros 1.1-1.6 ineteconomics bottom-up, 4.4 new university OSUN 3.4 end TB; Gates 1.1-1.6 digital finance; 2.1-2.6 extending mpesa in tanzania's green revolution; world bank 1.3 first 100 ultra poor nations co-researchers, 4,4 first 100 nations early childhood play co-researchers
in contrast tu unicorns, we define hunicorns as billion dollar startup networks to valuable to human life for exiting investors or quarrelsome political parties -hall of fame first 1000 hunicorn collabs with sir fazle abed

36 alumni networks for sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communities 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
.
...2016 bangladesh e-digital schools nationwide :: bangla video:::: brookings video:: :::brac how did this happen?
The Economist 1977

2020s earthlings have the great good fortune that over 50 years from 1970 to 2019, fazle abed helped 1 billion asian women end poverty through 6 connected community building networks celebrating the first 5 sdgs and youth mediating everything else to be first sdg generation -each with a collaboration legacy -we're here to help yu find the network you can most help empower further
ending poverty, celebrating sustainability goals & youthful community building = most enjoyable ways to network; fazle abed (oil company engineer inspired by franciscan values) helped billion asian mothers do this over 50 years - join most exciting action learning networks and lets map AI algorithms = optimal livesmatter community builders -2021 join in glasgow cop26 & dubai rewired greatest youth meetings ever with thanks to abed.games youthmarkets.com & worldrecordjobs.com
xx

Which 30 educational and economic partnerships most empower a billion women to end extreme poverty, and value their children’s sustainability? Fortunately for those caring about sustainability 2020s, we can map this by around partners and alumni of 50 years of servant leadership by fazle abed 1970-2019 together with legacy specifications mapped through his final decade

Viewed from 1970, Increasing life expectancy from 25 years below to average helped gravitate development economics world’s most trusted partnership – hence sustainability last mile service markets

3) last mile health
2) agriculture for village food security


4)non-linear livelihood education
5) timing what platforms partners could facilitate entrepreneurial revolution not not just inclusive community but cooperation in full and meaningful entrepreneurial employment

financial entreprenurial revolution for nation's people history excluded from machine age


Tuesday, August 31, 2021

1.3 ultra poor keys

 https://bracupgi.org/

Shameran Abed- 1.3              Ultra Poor Graduation
We are witness to monumental human progress.
... Over the past few decades, the expansion of the global marketplace has lifted a third of the world's population out of extreme poverty.Yet we are also witness to an astounding failure.Our efforts to lift people up have left behind those in the harshest forms of poverty-the ultra-poor.

00:35

What it means to be ultra-poor goes beyond the monetary definition that we're all familiar with:living on less than two dollars a day.

It goes even beyond not having assets like livestock or land. To be ultra-poor means to be stripped of your dignity,purpose and self-worth.

It means living in isolation, because you're a burden to your own community. It means being unable to imagine a better future for yourself and your family.By the end of 2019, about 400 million people were living in ultra-poverty worldwide.That's more than the populations of the United States and Canada combined.

And when calamity strikes, whether it's a pandemic, a natural disaster or a manmade crisis, these numbers spike astronomically higher.

01:28

My father, Fazle Abed, gave up a corporate career to establish BRAC here in Bangladesh in 1972.

Bangladesh was a wreck, having just gone through a devastating cyclone followed by a brutal war for independence.

Working with the poorest of the poor, my father realized that poverty was more than the lack of income and assets. It was also a lack of hope. People were trapped in poverty, because they felt their condition was immutable. Poverty, to them, was like the sun and the moon --something given to them by God.For poverty reduction programs to succeed, they would need to instill hope and self-worth so that, with a little support, people could lift themselves out of poverty. BRAC went on to pioneer the graduation approach, a solution to ultra-poverty that addresses both income poverty and the poverty of hope.

02:27

The approach works primarily with women, because women are the most affected by ultra-poverty but also the ones most likely to pull themselves and their families out of it. Over a two-year period,we essentially do four things.

One, we meet a woman's basic needs by giving her food or cash, ensuring the minimum to survive.

Two, we move her towards a decent livelihood by giving her an asset, like livestock,and training her to earn money from it.

Three, we train her to save, budget and invest her new wealth.

And four, we help to integrate her socially, first into groups of women like her and then into her community.

 

Each of these elements is key to the success of the others, but the real magic is the hope and sense of possibility the women develop through the close mentorship they receive.

03:24

Let me tell you about Jorina.Jorina was born in a remote village in northern Bangladesh.She never went to school, and at the age of 15, she was married off to an abusive husband. He eventually abandoned her, leaving her with no income and two children who were not in school and were severely malnourished. With no one to turn to for help, she had no hope.

Jorina joined BRAC's Graduation program in 2005. She received a dollar a week, two cows, enterprise training

and a weekly visit from a mentor. She began to build her assets, but most importantly, she began to imagine a better future for herself and her children.

If you were visit Jorina's village today, you would find that she runs the largest general store in her area. She will proudly show you the land she bought and the house she built.

Since we began this program in 2002,two million Bangladeshi women have lifted themselves and their families out of ultra-poverty.That's almost nine million people.The program, which costs 500 dollars per household, runs for only two years,but the impact goes well beyond that.

04:40

Researchers at the London School of Economics found that even seven years after entering the program,

92 percent of participants had maintained or increased their income, assets and consumption.

Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee, the MIT economists who won the Nobel Prize last year (2019), led multicountry evaluations that identified graduation as one of the most effective ways to break the poverty trap.

But my father wasn't content to have found a solution that worked for some people. He always wanted to know whether we were being ambitious enough. in terms of scale. So when we achieved nationwide scale in Bangladesh, he wanted to know how we could scale it globally. And that has to involve governments.

Governments already dedicate billions of dollars on poverty reduction programs. But so much of that money is wasted, because these programs either don't reach the poorest, and even the ones that do fail to have significant long-term impact.

05.45

We are working to engage governments to help them to adopt and scale graduation programs themselves,

maximizing the impact of the billions of dollars they already allocate to fight ultra-poverty.

Our plan is to help another 21 million people lift themselves out of ultra-poverty in eight countries over the next six years with BRAC teams on-site and embedded in each country.

In July of 2019, my father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancerand given four months to live.

As he transitioned out of BRAC after leading the organization for 47 years, he reminded us that throughout his life, he saw optimism triumph over despair, that when you light the spark of self-belief in people, even the poorest can transform their lives.

My father passed away in December. 2019.He lit that spark for millions of people,and in the final days of his life, he implored us to continue to do so for millions more.

This opportunity is ours for the taking, sp let's stop imagining a world without ultra-poverty and start building that world together. Thank You.

We are witness to monumental human progress. Over the past few decades, the expansion of the global marketplace has lifted a third of the world's population out of extreme poverty.Yet we are also witness to an astounding failure.Our efforts to lift people up have left behind those in the harshest forms of poverty-the ultra-poor.

00:35

What it means to be ultra-poor goes beyond the monetary definition that we're all familiar with:living on less than two dollars a day.

It goes even beyond not having assets like livestock or land. To be ultra-poor means to be stripped of your dignity,purpose and self-worth.

It means living in isolation, because you're a burden to your own community. It means being unable to imagine a better future for yourself and your family.By the end of 2019, about 400 million people were living in ultra-poverty worldwide.That's more than the populations of the United States and Canada combined.

And when calamity strikes, whether it's a pandemic, a natural disaster or a manmade crisis, these numbers spike astronomically higher.

01:28

My father, Fazle Abed, gave up a corporate career to establish BRAC here in Bangladesh in 1972.

Bangladesh was a wreck, having just gone through a devastating cyclone followed by a brutal war for independence.

Working with the poorest of the poor, my father realized that poverty was more than the lack of income and assets. It was also a lack of hope. People were trapped in poverty, because they felt their condition was immutable. Poverty, to them, was like the sun and the moon --something given to them by God.For poverty reduction programs to succeed, they would need to instill hope and self-worth so that, with a little support, people could lift themselves out of poverty. BRAC went on to pioneer the graduation approach, a solution to ultra-poverty that addresses both income poverty and the poverty of hope.

02:27

The approach works primarily with women, because women are the most affected by ultra-poverty but also the ones most likely to pull themselves and their families out of it. Over a two-year period,we essentially do four things.

One, we meet a woman's basic needs by giving her food or cash, ensuring the minimum to survive.

Two, we move her towards a decent livelihood by giving her an asset, like livestock,and training her to earn money from it.

Three, we train her to save, budget and invest her new wealth.

And four, we help to integrate her socially, first into groups of women like her and then into her community.

Each of these elements is key to the success of the others, but the real magic is the hope and sense of possibility the women develop through the close mentorship they receive.

03:24

Let me tell you about Jorina.Jorina was born in a remote village in northern Bangladesh.She never went to school, and at the age of 15, she was married off to an abusive husband. He eventually abandoned her, leaving her with no income and two children who were not in school and were severely malnourished. With no one to turn to for help, she had no hope.

Jorina joined BRAC's Graduation program in 2005. She received a dollar a week, two cows, enterprise training

and a weekly visit from a mentor. She began to build her assets, but most importantly, she began to imagine a better future for herself and her children.

If you were visit Jorina's village today, you would find that she runs the largest general store in her area. She will proudly show you the land she bought and the house she built.

Since we began this program in 2002,two million Bangladeshi women have lifted themselves and their families out of ultra-poverty.That's almost nine million people.The program, which costs 500 dollars per household, runs for only two years,but the impact goes well beyond that.

04:40

Researchers at the London School of Economics found that even seven years after entering the program,

92 percent of participants had maintained or increased their income, assets and consumption.

Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee, the MIT economists who won the Nobel Prize last year (2019), led multicountry evaluations that identified graduation as one of the most effective ways to break the poverty trap.

But my father wasn't content to have found a solution that worked for some people. He always wanted to know whether we were being ambitious enough. in terms of scale. So when we achieved nationwide scale in Bangladesh, he wanted to know how we could scale it globally. And that has to involve governments.

Governments already dedicate billions of dollars on poverty reduction programs. But so much of that money is wasted, because these programs either don't reach the poorest, and even the ones that do fail to have significant long-term impact.

05.45

We are working to engage governments to help them to adopt and scale graduation programs themselves,

maximizing the impact of the billions of dollars they already allocate to fight ultra-poverty.

Our plan is to help another 21 million people lift themselves out of ultra-poverty in eight countries over the next six years with BRAC teams on-site and embedded in each country.

In July of 2019, my father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancerand given four months to live.

As he transitioned out of BRAC after leading the organization for 47 years, he reminded us that throughout his life, he saw optimism triumph over despair, that when you light the spark of self-belief in people, even the poorest can transform their lives.

My father passed away in December. 2019.He lit that spark for millions of people,and in the final days of his life, he implored us to continue to do so for millions more.

This opportunity is ours for the taking, so let's stop imagining a world without ultra-poverty and start building that world together. Thank You.

--------------------------------------

related background research ultra poor at brac's institutional depository 

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