Friends of Fazle Abed study world class scaling of what we now call UN Sustainability Goals but Abed in 1972 first called Goal 1 Poverty alleviation when he founded BRA-C (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Collabs so that Bangladesh became the first nation empowered by poorest village women. Start with 3 favorite wESG (womens Entrepreneurial Scaling Goals : human collaborations of 100K ::1billion :: 50million

  • *** 100000 lives matter eg 5.1 metavillage= 1972

  • ...***1billion girls action networking -eg 3.1 oral rehydration

  • ***50 million graduate Apps: 5.4 purpose of first 100 new unis of sdg generation
1billiongirls.com - over the last half century the greatest human development miracle (extra ref schumacher 1 million bilages) has been networked by 1 billion poorest asian village women -here we invite you to help map the 30 collaborations they linkedin - their chief guide 2019-1970 the former oil company executive fazle abed- In spite of being pivotal to how one quarter of all human beings progressed (and by far the deepest co-creators of Sustainability goal solutions- nobody ever printed any paper money for them - its only since innovating the world's largest cashless banking 1.5 systems that many westerners even began to study 21st C happiest possibilities with them.
Out of Bangladesh, village mothers hired 100000 village coaches - webbed 30 collaborations - giant leaps for womankind & youth as first sustainability generation
Intergenerational collaboration entrepreneur platforms 5.1  metavillage sustainable community building - women empowered:15000 families at a time;5.2   billion asian women,5.3  brac net; 5.4   asian universities share sdg graduates 5.5  climate smart village exchanges,5.6 meta and zoom-me up scotty
BANK FOR ALL 1.1  1.2  1.3   1.4   1.5   1.6 celebrate 30 most human collaborations from developing world of last half-century - inspiring  anyone valuing UN and youth as first sustainability generation
EDUCATION  adult village entrepreneurs 4.1; primary 4.2  ; teen 4.3; university4.4 ; pre-school4.5;tech multidisciplinary luminaries 4.6 
HEALTH oral rehydration 3.1 ;para health "doordash" basic meds 3,2; scale vaccination3.3 ;tuberculosis & 3.4  Frugal processes eg wash sanitation, maternity3.5  ; James Grant School of public health 3.6
FOOD/land security 2.1  rice; 2.2 veggie  2.3    cash crops & village fair; 2.4  poultry;2.5  dairy, 2,6  14 nation leading supply chains financial opportunities to end poverty ;

UN says: Today's Education Systems No Longer Fit for PurposeAt Economistdiary.com we search out collaboration events- most exciting in 2022 - UN total transformation of education -september NY; Neumann's families collaboration search AI Hall of Fame; fen ale owners of transmedia race to humanise the metaverse...
abedMOOC.com started from a brainstorming dinner convened by Japan Ambassador to Dhaka who noticed my father's surveys of Asia Rising begun with Japan 1962 (endorsed by JF Kennedy) had not completely detailed Bangladesh Rural Advancement's  contributions to sustaining humanity and celebrating nation building through women empowerment . Dad's last public birthday party had celebrated launch of Muhammad Yunus Global Social Business Book February 2008 with 40 guests at Royal Automobile Club, St James, London. Father had also paid for sampling 2000 of Yunus books, 10000 dvds (youtube style interviews with all grameen directors during summer 2008 when the Nobel judges opened Yunus Museum in Mirpur, as well as part of launch of 2 Journals by Adam Smith Scholars in Glasgow that had emerged from Yunus making the 250th keynote speech on Adam Smith Moral Sentiments Dec 2008. But Fazle Abed whom my father never got the chance to meet had started 11 years before Yunus Grameen Bank 1983 Ordinance , built health and agricultural foundations, and then schooling -altogether a 5 dimensions approach that was not possible to appreciate from onee dimensional microcreditsummit yunus the clintons, queen Sofia staged annually from 1997. Abed said we could do a Mooc if it was laid out round C for collaborations. He was keen to map how 6  Collabs per the 5 primary sdgs had been integrated through 2 quarters of a century 1972-1995 when rural meant no electricity grids or phones; 1995 when partnering platforms afforded extraordinary leapfrog models that could be designed with mobile networks and solar. It took 16 trips while Abed was alive (and the curiosity og many graduate journalists _ to get this mooc started, and we still try to update it even as Abed left the world in Dec 2019. We welcome corrections and omissions. We have attempted here to map the deepest economic miracle

Tuesday, December 31, 2019

5.5 brac worlds largest ngo adaptability collaboration - state as at madrid cop end 2019

 Liakath Ali, Director of the Climate Change Programme in BRAC [image by: Joydeep Gupta]

Going by the number of people involved as members or partners, BRAC is the world’s largest NGO. At the December 2-13 UN climate summit in Madrid, it announced that it will now tailor all its development programmes to minimise climate risk in Bangladesh. thethirdpole.net spoke to Liakath Ali, Director of the Climate Change Programme in BRAC, about the new plans of the organisation.

Excerpts:

Incorporating or mainstreaming climate change in development is the responsibility of governments; Why is BRAC taking on this responsibility?

The magnitude of the challenges posed by climate change needs action from all parties – both government and non-government – to solve the crisis and continue existence on the only planet we have got.  To make resilience mainstream is the key.

Since its inception BRAC has been working with the government of Bangladesh. The organisation has a reach of over 120 million people in Bangladesh and 11 other countries. We think mainstreaming climate resilience not the responsibility of governments only. It is our collective responsibility to face the biggest threat in human history.

What are the expected impacts of your new approach?

Conventional and business-as-usual approach in the development sector is not effective in overcoming the climate challenges. A comprehensive drive is a must. To do this in quick time and to cover more vulnerable people, mainstreaming is necessary. The concept of resilience talks about not only adaptation. It covers adaptive capacity, anticipatory capacity, adsorptive capacity and transformation. Through its various programmes, BRAC can do it faster than others.

For example, if we think of providing livelihood support without considering future climate change impacts, the support may not attain its objectives. If the climate change impacts are considered from the very beginning then the support could be more effective.

How are you mainstreaming climate resilience in your projects?

The most important initial action in mainstreaming is to assess organisational readiness, followed by proper capacity building, appropriate activity designing and allocating resources. BRAC has done an in-depth assessment of its readiness in mainstreaming climate change, formulated related policies such as BRAC climate change strategy, environmental and social safeguards, and an environmental policy. It also tries to align with governments’ policies, strategies and plans to deal with climate change.

The organisation has been doing capacity building of its staff. Right at the project design stage, we screen programmes through a climate lens. All programmes are made climate smart so that they are sustainable.

How many people have you reached? What is your target?

In 2018 alone, we reached 1.7 million people in around 336,000 households through integrated climate-resilient solutions. In 2020, the figure will reach 2.65 million.

Can you explain the services through which you are reaching people?

We support people with adaptive and climate resilient water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services, low cost resilient housing in urban and rural contexts, adaptive agricultural technologies, and livelihood options. We also provide climate information in our education curriculum, plant trees and provide solar home systems. We connect people to access finance, build capacity of our staff and create awareness. We are building capacity among the communities we work. We focus on working with the youth, our future leaders who will have to tackle climate change.

What are the challenges you face?

We are working in a dynamic situation. Sea level rise, salinity, frequency and magnitude of the climate-related disasters like floods and cyclones are increasing. Finding appropriate technology in every context is a big challenge. Another big challenge is to find money for climate-resilient projects. Yet another is the absence of long-term climate impact projections at a local scale. Due to this, it becomes more difficult to plan climate-resilient projects. For example, the Haor (wetland) areas in [north-eastern] Bangladesh usually experience flash flood in mid-May. But in 2017, the region had flash floods three weeks earlier, when around a million farmers were waiting to harvest their only crop. Two million tons of foodgrains were damaged. If we had known about this possibility, we may have advised farmers to sow crops that mature faster.

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