download one page tour to 50 years of building partners empowering Asian village women to end poverty, design last mile health service and much more- how brac became the ngo world's largest networking economy DAY I ALMOST CHOKED EATING SUSHI WITH FAZLE ABED; he was telling his story: Bangladesh was less than 1 year old- it was 1972 and wanting to do more that being young Asia's leading oil company ceo, his greatest mistake was spending his life savings on building homes for 100000 refugees. Being an engineer I knew how to do that. But as we were opening the meta-village a young lady came up to me : what education/village enterprises do we need to prevent dozens of girls starving every week and scores of infants dying from dehydration? So she & I learnt we needed to innovate 5 last mile services for any space girls are born- safe homes, education, health, food, finance; in searching we found a billion village mothers wanting to COLLAB. ..video 1
Download 2-page guide ...consider cases of new nations after world war 2- how many cases lived up to the peoples simplest dreams, end poverty, food/health/safety for every family member, education geared to decent jobs and happiness? bangladesh did something different- empowering 90% of women to find partners in building their own communities- .over 50 years a new economic model emerged which a billion asian women applied to end extreme poverty- how?.sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communitY 1 PLATFORMS 1 PLATFORMS 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
examples from abed builder of largest ngo partnership: Reeta Roy MCF 3.3 1billion$ to vaccinate continent africa 4.3 uganda; Soros 1.1-1.6 ineteconomics bottom-up, 4.4 new university OSUN 3.4 end TB; Gates 1.1-1.6 digital finance; 2.1-2.6 extending mpesa in tanzania's green revolution; world bank 1.3 first 100 ultra poor nations co-researchers, 4,4 first 100 nations early childhood play co-researchers
in contrast tu unicorns, we define hunicorns as billion dollar startup networks to valuable to human life for exiting investors or quarrelsome political parties -hall of fame first 1000 hunicorn collabs with sir fazle abed

36 alumni networks for sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communities 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
.
...2016 bangladesh e-digital schools nationwide :: bangla video:::: brookings video:: :::brac how did this happen?
The Economist 1977

2020s earthlings have the great good fortune that over 50 years from 1970 to 2019, fazle abed helped 1 billion asian women end poverty through 6 connected community building networks celebrating the first 5 sdgs and youth mediating everything else to be first sdg generation -each with a collaboration legacy -we're here to help yu find the network you can most help empower further
ending poverty, celebrating sustainability goals & youthful community building = most enjoyable ways to network; fazle abed (oil company engineer inspired by franciscan values) helped billion asian mothers do this over 50 years - join most exciting action learning networks and lets map AI algorithms = optimal livesmatter community builders -2021 join in glasgow cop26 & dubai rewired greatest youth meetings ever with thanks to abed.games youthmarkets.com & worldrecordjobs.com
xx

Which 30 educational and economic partnerships most empower a billion women to end extreme poverty, and value their children’s sustainability? Fortunately for those caring about sustainability 2020s, we can map this by around partners and alumni of 50 years of servant leadership by fazle abed 1970-2019 together with legacy specifications mapped through his final decade

Viewed from 1970, Increasing life expectancy from 25 years below to average helped gravitate development economics world’s most trusted partnership – hence sustainability last mile service markets

3) last mile health
2) agriculture for village food security


4)non-linear livelihood education
5) timing what platforms partners could facilitate entrepreneurial revolution not not just inclusive community but cooperation in full and meaningful entrepreneurial employment

financial entreprenurial revolution for nation's people history excluded from machine age


Monday, September 20, 2021

2.

 1972 being an engineer abed spent his life savings building homes for 100000 villagers 5.1 only to find village mothers first question - what education/livelihoods do we need to end starvation> - dozens of mothers/daughters died weekly in abed's meta vilage until he (and partners) designed microfranchise solutions starting with rice 2.1 and last mile health services oral rehydration 3.1 and doordash (300 homes weekly per micrfranchise) 3.2

updates student year 21-22 sept which nations in asia most desperately need food solutions during covid -  eg phillippines community pantry

best news during UNGA 76 Browns Job/Law



Wednesday, September 1, 2021

5.4 collab of new asian universities - each with at least one sustainability solution grads can help 50 million people scale next

sept 2021 breaking what if  Conscious Japans man and woman of the year PM Suga/Superstar Osaka were knowhow- accessible for every asian sdg graduate of 21-22?

==================  

until 1996 potential partners of fazle abed could exchange/experiment in village labs all over bangladesh - then in quick succession two new collab platforms:  5.3 bracnet (with japan and silicon valley co-founders) opened up internet partnerships in 1996 and in 2001 brac university 4.4  began- 

entrusted in asia with 30 years of leadership networking, abed started a truly extraordinary hi-level  search across Asian nations - which first 100 asian new universities wanted to share solutions each of which 2015+ graduates could help 50 million or more people scale -

following the UN sdgs 2030 logic -if millennials are to be the first sustainability generation they will need to network trust /love in communities with such urgent and tech-local-deep solutions that classroom professors of theory in old university silos and slow moving journals can't empower youth to do quick enough to prevent extinction  

today brac university is sharing two by  50-million plus designs abed spent his last years mobilising research partners including new nobel economics laureates around - 

4.5 early childhood playschools -latest paper on playschools rohinga june 2021



1.3 ultra poverty graduation - added to the job responsibilities of abed's son shameran leading brac international and its pivotal connectivity with ultra poverty collabs in dozens of countries

chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk co-editor economistdiary.com/abedmooc.com, linkedin UNwomens:2021-2 please tell us if you know of other graduatie scaling ops as relevant to youth celebrating being the first sustanability generation as well as so-called kerry's last chance for humanity 

more coming soon both from brc university and asian universities that accepted the 50 million challenge , nd of course what abed linkedin as the worl'ship and one billion womens network ending exreme poverty, and glasgow university adam smith scholars now in 11th year designing journals that make calls fir this graduate years most exciting collaborations as well as publish elders stuff -do you know anything cop26 needs graduate collabs to scale everywhere in next 12 months?

========================

30 years ahead of the rest of the world . abed started up community platforms where the world's most trusted partners could trade systems solutions poorest village women need to network round for life sustaining purpose 5.1 100000 person meta village; 5.2 bottom billion village women scaled during brac's first 12 year; blended platforms including 5.3 bracnet and start of 100 collab asian new 5.4 university partnerships exponentially accelerating from 1996 and 2001

not everyone understands data mapped around a platform is the only transparent way to humanise #aiforgood- fortunately abed was an engineer that did understand- 10 years of pen, paper and slide ruler 5 year planning at shell made him always ready to help empower worlds poorest villagers with smartest maths and maps have to offer

sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communities 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 

2.3 rural crafts and cash crops and aarong

 from 1978 aarong was established as a social enterprise (retail channel) for rural crafts:;some reports on aarong from brac university 4.4/5.4 business group are here

among 30 collab networks mapped by abed - our 3rd on sdg 2.3 - include cash crops and other rural businesses eg brac silk which were designed to bring income to villagers from bangladesh citizens  ;across generations  brac's arts focus prepared the way for village daughters to contribute eg to garments businesses in the city - bangladesh's major export

aarong was inspired by fazle abed's first wife ayesha who died 1981  - her foundation

in The Economist searches of the world's most purposeful/sustainability leaders sub-edited by my father norman macrae over 40 years  and personally mediated with his biography of john von neumann continuing to 2010 -

MATHS CHAOS 2020s we mother earth's 7.5 billion beings of 2020s -after six decades of 100 times "moore" technology are chaos-connected by nature's demands from the 2020s - defining decade both of human sustainability and humanising artificial intelligence

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6
2.1 2.2 2.3

 IN SEARCH OF SUSTAINABILITY COLLABS fazle abed comes top but the loveq culture of the world's largest ngo partnerships and a billion womens empowerment was multiplied by ayesha - abed bhabi,  alongside abed bhai and now son shameran leading 1.6 brac international as well as the 5 dimensional integration of finance and data-mapping community's deepest sustainability goals


AAF (since 1982) employer of 25000 female artisans https://www.aarong.com/us/newspost/ayesha-abed-foundation.html    Aarong (since 1978) https://www.aarong.com/about-aarong
Ayesha Abed Foundation (AAF) Centers In 1982 the Ayesha Abed Foundation (“AAF”) was established to commemorate the memory and work of the late Mrs. Ayesha Abed, a BRAC staff member and spouse of the late Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, founder of BRAC. The Foundation was created to provide an appropriate working environment, financial and technical assistance and training to develop women’s skills in various crafts. The AAF’s first project, the Manikgonj Centre was opened on September 3, 1983. As of 2020, the Ayesha Abed Foundation operates 15 AAF centres and over 700 sub centers that are responsible for employing over 25,000, mainly female, artisans. The AAF aims to work with the most underprivileged women in the society; therefore, the centers and sub-centers are located in semi-urban or rural areas. AAF combines workers with other women of similar socioeconomic background and provides and environment focused on achievement and personal growth. Women are trained and then given the opportunity to generate income and increase their job responsibility over time. Additionally, the AAF centres and sub-centre workers are given access to the other BRAC programmes. The AAF produces handicraft items that require a large labour input. The vast majority of the women employed at the sub-centre level perform the embroidery work and the other processes including block printing, screen printing, dyeing, tie-dyeing and weaving are performed at the main centers. Major products include: • Men’s ethnic apparel – panjabi, fatua, tagga • Women’s ethnic apparel – shalwar-kameez-dupatta, saree, yoke, coaty, long dress, korta, shawl, tagga • Household & others – bed covers, cushion covers, wall mats, tablecloths, bags, purses, napkins, stools, nakshi kantha AAF is devoted to the socio-economic empowerment of all women and therefore provides a comprehensive set of worker benefits including: • Free health check-ups and medical care for referral cases • Free eye examinations and eye-glasses • Health security scheme to subside inpatient hospitalisation • Awareness training on workers’ rights • Welfare fund and retirement benefits • Advance wage payments • Daycare centre

Tuesday, August 31, 2021

1.3 ultra poor keys

 https://bracupgi.org/

Shameran Abed- 1.3              Ultra Poor Graduation
We are witness to monumental human progress.
... Over the past few decades, the expansion of the global marketplace has lifted a third of the world's population out of extreme poverty.Yet we are also witness to an astounding failure.Our efforts to lift people up have left behind those in the harshest forms of poverty-the ultra-poor.

00:35

What it means to be ultra-poor goes beyond the monetary definition that we're all familiar with:living on less than two dollars a day.

It goes even beyond not having assets like livestock or land. To be ultra-poor means to be stripped of your dignity,purpose and self-worth.

It means living in isolation, because you're a burden to your own community. It means being unable to imagine a better future for yourself and your family.By the end of 2019, about 400 million people were living in ultra-poverty worldwide.That's more than the populations of the United States and Canada combined.

And when calamity strikes, whether it's a pandemic, a natural disaster or a manmade crisis, these numbers spike astronomically higher.

01:28

My father, Fazle Abed, gave up a corporate career to establish BRAC here in Bangladesh in 1972.

Bangladesh was a wreck, having just gone through a devastating cyclone followed by a brutal war for independence.

Working with the poorest of the poor, my father realized that poverty was more than the lack of income and assets. It was also a lack of hope. People were trapped in poverty, because they felt their condition was immutable. Poverty, to them, was like the sun and the moon --something given to them by God.For poverty reduction programs to succeed, they would need to instill hope and self-worth so that, with a little support, people could lift themselves out of poverty. BRAC went on to pioneer the graduation approach, a solution to ultra-poverty that addresses both income poverty and the poverty of hope.

02:27

The approach works primarily with women, because women are the most affected by ultra-poverty but also the ones most likely to pull themselves and their families out of it. Over a two-year period,we essentially do four things.

One, we meet a woman's basic needs by giving her food or cash, ensuring the minimum to survive.

Two, we move her towards a decent livelihood by giving her an asset, like livestock,and training her to earn money from it.

Three, we train her to save, budget and invest her new wealth.

And four, we help to integrate her socially, first into groups of women like her and then into her community.

 

Each of these elements is key to the success of the others, but the real magic is the hope and sense of possibility the women develop through the close mentorship they receive.

03:24

Let me tell you about Jorina.Jorina was born in a remote village in northern Bangladesh.She never went to school, and at the age of 15, she was married off to an abusive husband. He eventually abandoned her, leaving her with no income and two children who were not in school and were severely malnourished. With no one to turn to for help, she had no hope.

Jorina joined BRAC's Graduation program in 2005. She received a dollar a week, two cows, enterprise training

and a weekly visit from a mentor. She began to build her assets, but most importantly, she began to imagine a better future for herself and her children.

If you were visit Jorina's village today, you would find that she runs the largest general store in her area. She will proudly show you the land she bought and the house she built.

Since we began this program in 2002,two million Bangladeshi women have lifted themselves and their families out of ultra-poverty.That's almost nine million people.The program, which costs 500 dollars per household, runs for only two years,but the impact goes well beyond that.

04:40

Researchers at the London School of Economics found that even seven years after entering the program,

92 percent of participants had maintained or increased their income, assets and consumption.

Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee, the MIT economists who won the Nobel Prize last year (2019), led multicountry evaluations that identified graduation as one of the most effective ways to break the poverty trap.

But my father wasn't content to have found a solution that worked for some people. He always wanted to know whether we were being ambitious enough. in terms of scale. So when we achieved nationwide scale in Bangladesh, he wanted to know how we could scale it globally. And that has to involve governments.

Governments already dedicate billions of dollars on poverty reduction programs. But so much of that money is wasted, because these programs either don't reach the poorest, and even the ones that do fail to have significant long-term impact.

05.45

We are working to engage governments to help them to adopt and scale graduation programs themselves,

maximizing the impact of the billions of dollars they already allocate to fight ultra-poverty.

Our plan is to help another 21 million people lift themselves out of ultra-poverty in eight countries over the next six years with BRAC teams on-site and embedded in each country.

In July of 2019, my father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancerand given four months to live.

As he transitioned out of BRAC after leading the organization for 47 years, he reminded us that throughout his life, he saw optimism triumph over despair, that when you light the spark of self-belief in people, even the poorest can transform their lives.

My father passed away in December. 2019.He lit that spark for millions of people,and in the final days of his life, he implored us to continue to do so for millions more.

This opportunity is ours for the taking, sp let's stop imagining a world without ultra-poverty and start building that world together. Thank You.

We are witness to monumental human progress. Over the past few decades, the expansion of the global marketplace has lifted a third of the world's population out of extreme poverty.Yet we are also witness to an astounding failure.Our efforts to lift people up have left behind those in the harshest forms of poverty-the ultra-poor.

00:35

What it means to be ultra-poor goes beyond the monetary definition that we're all familiar with:living on less than two dollars a day.

It goes even beyond not having assets like livestock or land. To be ultra-poor means to be stripped of your dignity,purpose and self-worth.

It means living in isolation, because you're a burden to your own community. It means being unable to imagine a better future for yourself and your family.By the end of 2019, about 400 million people were living in ultra-poverty worldwide.That's more than the populations of the United States and Canada combined.

And when calamity strikes, whether it's a pandemic, a natural disaster or a manmade crisis, these numbers spike astronomically higher.

01:28

My father, Fazle Abed, gave up a corporate career to establish BRAC here in Bangladesh in 1972.

Bangladesh was a wreck, having just gone through a devastating cyclone followed by a brutal war for independence.

Working with the poorest of the poor, my father realized that poverty was more than the lack of income and assets. It was also a lack of hope. People were trapped in poverty, because they felt their condition was immutable. Poverty, to them, was like the sun and the moon --something given to them by God.For poverty reduction programs to succeed, they would need to instill hope and self-worth so that, with a little support, people could lift themselves out of poverty. BRAC went on to pioneer the graduation approach, a solution to ultra-poverty that addresses both income poverty and the poverty of hope.

02:27

The approach works primarily with women, because women are the most affected by ultra-poverty but also the ones most likely to pull themselves and their families out of it. Over a two-year period,we essentially do four things.

One, we meet a woman's basic needs by giving her food or cash, ensuring the minimum to survive.

Two, we move her towards a decent livelihood by giving her an asset, like livestock,and training her to earn money from it.

Three, we train her to save, budget and invest her new wealth.

And four, we help to integrate her socially, first into groups of women like her and then into her community.

Each of these elements is key to the success of the others, but the real magic is the hope and sense of possibility the women develop through the close mentorship they receive.

03:24

Let me tell you about Jorina.Jorina was born in a remote village in northern Bangladesh.She never went to school, and at the age of 15, she was married off to an abusive husband. He eventually abandoned her, leaving her with no income and two children who were not in school and were severely malnourished. With no one to turn to for help, she had no hope.

Jorina joined BRAC's Graduation program in 2005. She received a dollar a week, two cows, enterprise training

and a weekly visit from a mentor. She began to build her assets, but most importantly, she began to imagine a better future for herself and her children.

If you were visit Jorina's village today, you would find that she runs the largest general store in her area. She will proudly show you the land she bought and the house she built.

Since we began this program in 2002,two million Bangladeshi women have lifted themselves and their families out of ultra-poverty.That's almost nine million people.The program, which costs 500 dollars per household, runs for only two years,but the impact goes well beyond that.

04:40

Researchers at the London School of Economics found that even seven years after entering the program,

92 percent of participants had maintained or increased their income, assets and consumption.

Esther Duflo and Abhijit Banerjee, the MIT economists who won the Nobel Prize last year (2019), led multicountry evaluations that identified graduation as one of the most effective ways to break the poverty trap.

But my father wasn't content to have found a solution that worked for some people. He always wanted to know whether we were being ambitious enough. in terms of scale. So when we achieved nationwide scale in Bangladesh, he wanted to know how we could scale it globally. And that has to involve governments.

Governments already dedicate billions of dollars on poverty reduction programs. But so much of that money is wasted, because these programs either don't reach the poorest, and even the ones that do fail to have significant long-term impact.

05.45

We are working to engage governments to help them to adopt and scale graduation programs themselves,

maximizing the impact of the billions of dollars they already allocate to fight ultra-poverty.

Our plan is to help another 21 million people lift themselves out of ultra-poverty in eight countries over the next six years with BRAC teams on-site and embedded in each country.

In July of 2019, my father was diagnosed with terminal brain cancerand given four months to live.

As he transitioned out of BRAC after leading the organization for 47 years, he reminded us that throughout his life, he saw optimism triumph over despair, that when you light the spark of self-belief in people, even the poorest can transform their lives.

My father passed away in December. 2019.He lit that spark for millions of people,and in the final days of his life, he implored us to continue to do so for millions more.

This opportunity is ours for the taking, so let's stop imagining a world without ultra-poverty and start building that world together. Thank You.

--------------------------------------

related background research ultra poor at brac's institutional depository 

Saturday, August 28, 2021

3.2 updates on doordash for health

few black holes in economics more urgently need filling than how village mothers built rural nations health service

one of brac's earliest inventions was a microfranchise enabling a village mother to make positive cashflow from weekly visits to village homes offering basic health products -each para health worker was assigned 300 homes- over years she became these microcommunities most trusted connectors with all rural advances in health 

  2021 update on this 40 year movement for last mile community health

movement features in 10 intercountry comparisons of community health


Thursday, August 19, 2021

*4


young journalists and i visited bangladesh 15 times during fazle abed's lasr decade+-acrually 2007-19 

we became convinced that youth as first sustainability generation would be easy if only there were more people like fazle abed- we have the tech and human brains to beat covid, to align with nature, to love children..

we've catalogued 36 ways - 6 dimensions by 6 times - over sir fazles last 50 year action learning networking when different resources connected to help the poorest mothers in the world build the rural nation of bangladesh and to celebrate anyone who helped them (footnote 1);  to get to know abed from his alumni , investors and others who love the goal that wherever the next girl (or boy is born) she's has a happy and great chance at life

education is the way that excites us mst becausethe way abed saw life everyone's both a student (and skills teachers as parent or community servant)
four education dimensions connect typical student age- 
    from leaflet starting abed's last of 5 decades 2010s

..footnote 5.2 bangladesh mothers most amazing supporters- get out map of continent asia 1971 - can you see why chinese village mothers faced similar life-shaping challenges?- back in 1971 bangladesh was the porrest 75 million person nation and china the poorest 750 million person nation- and both countries peoples came to the conclusion that only female productivity could collaboratively save their space on the planet- last mile health livelihoods, last mile food livelihoods, last mile financing, last mile education -all became a billion womens challenge to entreprenurially solve...
=======
playschool summer tour 2021- related web - twitter  linkedin
We are on a journey to redefine play and reimagine learning. Because play is how children learn best.
MORE LEGO EDU TWITTERS - VENTURES IN EDU
x
https://www.brac.net/program/education/

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

3.5 partners -affordable-health frugal - brac delivery kit child birth, child stunting, wash ... bottom of pyramid market leadership microhealth, microagri ....

PARTNERS IN AFFORDABLE HEALTH what i have learnt from 15 trips to bangladesh and more broadly from 50 to asia is sustainability will most likely depend on celebrating those who empower health networks around love not those who power over health with money -happy to zoom or debate cases on this any time rsvp chris.macrae@yahoo.co.uk

frugal is the terminology brac celebrates in innovating health and well being services in life critical ways but on minimal budgets- brac's doubling of network services every 2.5 years emerged as south/east partnering centre of gravity 10 years ahead of western bottom of pyramid studies -eg gary hamel , and 3.2 the building of the microfranchise of women health suppliers goes back to start of brac early 1970s 

we find searches of brac delivery kits first produced 1998 offer a range of reports and academic inputs illustrating brac's longitudinal work and increasing centre of gravity for frugal partnerships 


In the developing world, life often runs on jugaad solutions. According to the authors of Jugaad Innovation: Think Frugal, Be Flexible, Generate Breakthrough Growth, western businesses could learn a lot from the jugaad approach of innovation and radical affordability.

Development organizations, too, must create inexpensive and adaptable solutions to alleviate poverty. The BRAC birthing kit is one such example.

BRAC has grappled with the problem of high maternal and infant mortality in a country where the vast majority of women still give birth at home without a skilled attendant. Your response might be to build more or bigger hospitals; BRAC instead brought suitable alternatives to the women themselves, in the form of “birthing huts” in the slums of Dhaka and other Bangladeshi cities, as well as the BRAC birthing kits.

A BRAC birthing kit contains the necessary tools for a safe and sterile delivery: gauze, carbolic soap, a sterile plastic sheet to go over the mattress, a thread to tie the umbilical cord and a surgical blade to cut it. That’s it.

It might not be the most elegant solution, but it transforms any home into a safe and sterile place to have a baby. The cost to the consumer? A mere 40 cents.

By slimming the product down to the bare necessities, the birthing kit is simple to manufacture and distribute. At the Sanitary Napkin and Delivery Kits unit, a BRAC social enterprise, the kit costs 28 cents to make. It is then sold to BRAC’s Health Program for 32 cents, the same price at which it is sold to BRAC community health promoters, or shasthya shebikas in Bengali. These women are trained by BRAC and, as part of a range of products and services they provide, sell the kits for 40 cents to their community.

Since 1999, BRAC has manufactured more than 2.6 million of these.

Of course, it’s not enough to only have a birthing kit. A skilled attendant is still necessary to manage complications. You might think it’s time to send in the doctors, but BRAC learned that with a bit of training – and access to a network of qualified help should complications arise – women from the community can be trained to be skilled birth attendants.

BRAC has made headway in frugal innovation by providing products and services that are affordable, accessible, and – crucially – relevant to those being served. BRAC has already seen measurable results; meanwhile Bangladesh is well on its way to reducing maternal and child mortality by the 2015 deadline of the UN Millennium Development Goals.


this journal paper written 2003 clarifies work brac had been doing for a decade

upsated examples 

The Manoshi Project at BRAC provides community-based maternal, neonatal and child health services for 6.9 million urban slum dwellers in 10 cities in Bangladesh. At the time of the project’s inception in 2007, this population had high maternal and neonatal mortality. The first brac maternal delivery kits started production in 1998  and became incorporated in the enterprise that also manufactures sanitary towels from 2007

2 hours in 3-part dvd series on fazle abed/brac published 2006 by jeff skoll with ashoka

the 2005 pbs television series rx for survival featured sit fazle abed and brac prominently  - we have footnoted the group of 15 global health champions the way pbs profiled them

- brac became increasingly celebrated (by gates foundation, soros foundation, jim kim and paul farmers pih) for global health innovations through decade 2002-12 (more recent frugal summaries as brac host annual forums - youtube example

=============================================

pbs global health champions 2005

During production for Rx for Survival, we encountered a great number of individuals making a tremendous difference on the front lines of global health. Some work in remote rural communities; others create national or international public health initiatives. The following profiles of these global health champions are but a small sample of the many fine people, past and present, who have made public health their life's work.


Fazle Hasan Abed

Fazle Hasan Abed

Founder and Chairperson
BRAC (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee)


As leader of one of the most effective non-governmental organizations in the world, Abed has fought against poverty, disease, child mortality, and illiteracy by educating and empowering the poor women of rural Bangladesh.

Uche Amazigo

Uche Amazigo, PhD

World Health Organization, African Program for Onchocerciasis Control


River blindness, a condition caused by worms that damage the eyes to the point of blindness, affects 12 African nations. With determination and diplomacy, Amazigo has implemented a low-cost, sustainable strategy to distribute a medicine that may eradicate this disease.

Andrea ColemanBarry Coleman

Andrea and Barry Coleman

Co-Founders
Riders for Health


Their shared love of motorcycles inspired a marriage and the founding of an organization that provides African health care workers with motorcycles to transport patients and deliver medical supplies.

Ernest Darkoh

Ernest Darkoh, MD, MPH, MBA

Chairman and Founding Partner, BroadReach
Former Operations Manager, Botswana's Treatment Program for HIV/AIDS


Darkoh is building a nationwide health system from the ground up in Botswana through a public-private collaboration between the government of the small African nation and foundations.

Paul Farmer

Paul Farmer, MD, PhD

Founding Director
Partners in Health


He has been described as "a man who would cure the world." Trained as a medical anthropologist and physician, the Robin Hood of global health has begged, borrowed, and stolen AIDS drugs to treat the poor in Haiti.

William H. Foege

William H. Foege, MD

Professor and Health Policy Fellow, Emory University
Former Head, CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


In the 1970s he led the smallpox eradication campaign in India and later persuaded governments and drug companies to support polio eradication efforts. Today he is on the front lines of the battle to overcome the public's resistance to the use of vaccines.

Donald R. Hopkins

Donald R. Hopkins, MD, MPH

Associate Executive Director
The Carter Center


For a long time, Hopkins was alone in his belief that Guinea worm disease could be eradicated. Through worldwide campaigns and community mobilization efforts, he now stands on the brink of its worldwide eradication.

Dr. Jim Yong Kim

Jim Yong Kim, MD, PhD

Co-Founder, Partners in Health
Director of HIV/AIDS, World Health Organization


Supported in part by a MacArthur Foundation genius grant he received in 2003, Kim is on his way to achieving an ambitious goal: to get three million AIDS patients worldwide onto antiretroviral drugs by the end of 2005.

Rohima

Rohima

Volunteer
BRAC Community Health


A grassroots community health worker, Rohima never finished primary school, but today she monitors the health of 300 households in Bangladesh. She is among 33,000 women who have taken charge of their families' health and started microfinanced businesses.

Remko SchatsLina Gustin

Remko Schats, MD and Lina Gustin, RN

Doctors Without Borders

 


This physician and nurse team treat 17,000 people in a refugee camp in western Chad. During their six-month mission they will deal with the threat of measles, poor sanitation, armed bandits, and Sudanese militias.

Dr. Jaime Sepulveda

Jaime Sepulveda Amor, PhD

Director General
Mexican National Institutes of Health


Presented with a possible cholera epidemic, Sepulveda launched a massive clean-water program in Mexico, with an aggressive communications campaign to alert people to the ways the disease is transmitted.

Alfred Sommer

Alfred Sommer, MD, MHS

Dean Emeritus and Professor
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Sommer discovered that children in Indonesia were dying of complications from nightblindness, a condition arising from vitamin A deficiency. His findings and identification of an inexpensive cure have dramatically reduced childhood mortality.

Mechai Viravaidya

Mechai Viravaidya

Founder and Board Chairman
The Population & Community Development Association


With humor and determination, Viravaidya has fought for family planning and safe sex in Thailand. Known as "the condom king," his effort to reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS in Thailand has been remarkably successful.

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ck prahalad's classic the fortune at the bottom of the pyramid -eradicating poverty through profits was published in 2005 but must have taken several years to assemble

-its major cases came from india peru brazil mexico venezuela

main health cases were india's aravind eye care and india's prosthetic jaipur footand india's annapurna salt which targets solutions to idd iodine deficiency disorder; india's hindustan  lever targeting of soap markets towards mitigation of diarrheal diseases 

peru voxiva tech for early detection of infectious diseases