Join in celebrating the 30 most productive collaborations 2020-1970 of women empowered sustainability generation goals 1 -5 and help log advances to 2025 Fazle Abed partners and 1billion girls mapped these 30 collaborations -six each for education , health, food/land, finance to end poverty, societal platforms for partners in 100% community (women as productive as men, young & old, colored & white
education opportunities 4.1 adult skills; 4.2 primary; 4.3 teen ; 4.4 university; 4.5 pre-school ;4.6 multidisciplinary education luminaries health opportunities
3.1 oral rehydration 3.2 para health "doordash" basic medicines 3.3 scale vaccination 3.4 tuberculosis 3.5 Frugal processes eg wash sanitation, maternity; 3.6 James Grant School of public health food/land opportunities
2.1 rice 2.2 veggie 2.3 cash crops & village fair2.4 poultry 2.5 dairy, 2.6 14 nation leading supply chains financial opportunities to end poverty
1.1 change aid (sustainable charity), microfinance+, 1.3 ultra poor, 1.4 city bank 1.5 bkash, 1.6 hq2 brac intl netherlands
platforms for 100% lives matter community (women as productive as men , all skin cols equal opportunity etc)
5.1 100k person metavillage; 1 billion asian women, brac net, 5.4 100 asian universities share sdg graduates 5.5 climate smart village exchanges, 5.6 zoom me up scotty: adamsmith.app 2022: year 264 in search of moral market leadership

Tuesday, December 31, 2019

5.5 brac worlds largest ngo adaptability collaboration - state as at madrid cop end 2019

 Liakath Ali, Director of the Climate Change Programme in BRAC [image by: Joydeep Gupta]

Going by the number of people involved as members or partners, BRAC is the world’s largest NGO. At the December 2-13 UN climate summit in Madrid, it announced that it will now tailor all its development programmes to minimise climate risk in Bangladesh. thethirdpole.net spoke to Liakath Ali, Director of the Climate Change Programme in BRAC, about the new plans of the organisation.

Excerpts:

Incorporating or mainstreaming climate change in development is the responsibility of governments; Why is BRAC taking on this responsibility?

The magnitude of the challenges posed by climate change needs action from all parties – both government and non-government – to solve the crisis and continue existence on the only planet we have got.  To make resilience mainstream is the key.

Since its inception BRAC has been working with the government of Bangladesh. The organisation has a reach of over 120 million people in Bangladesh and 11 other countries. We think mainstreaming climate resilience not the responsibility of governments only. It is our collective responsibility to face the biggest threat in human history.

What are the expected impacts of your new approach?

Conventional and business-as-usual approach in the development sector is not effective in overcoming the climate challenges. A comprehensive drive is a must. To do this in quick time and to cover more vulnerable people, mainstreaming is necessary. The concept of resilience talks about not only adaptation. It covers adaptive capacity, anticipatory capacity, adsorptive capacity and transformation. Through its various programmes, BRAC can do it faster than others.

For example, if we think of providing livelihood support without considering future climate change impacts, the support may not attain its objectives. If the climate change impacts are considered from the very beginning then the support could be more effective.

How are you mainstreaming climate resilience in your projects?

The most important initial action in mainstreaming is to assess organisational readiness, followed by proper capacity building, appropriate activity designing and allocating resources. BRAC has done an in-depth assessment of its readiness in mainstreaming climate change, formulated related policies such as BRAC climate change strategy, environmental and social safeguards, and an environmental policy. It also tries to align with governments’ policies, strategies and plans to deal with climate change.

The organisation has been doing capacity building of its staff. Right at the project design stage, we screen programmes through a climate lens. All programmes are made climate smart so that they are sustainable.

How many people have you reached? What is your target?

In 2018 alone, we reached 1.7 million people in around 336,000 households through integrated climate-resilient solutions. In 2020, the figure will reach 2.65 million.

Can you explain the services through which you are reaching people?

We support people with adaptive and climate resilient water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services, low cost resilient housing in urban and rural contexts, adaptive agricultural technologies, and livelihood options. We also provide climate information in our education curriculum, plant trees and provide solar home systems. We connect people to access finance, build capacity of our staff and create awareness. We are building capacity among the communities we work. We focus on working with the youth, our future leaders who will have to tackle climate change.

What are the challenges you face?

We are working in a dynamic situation. Sea level rise, salinity, frequency and magnitude of the climate-related disasters like floods and cyclones are increasing. Finding appropriate technology in every context is a big challenge. Another big challenge is to find money for climate-resilient projects. Yet another is the absence of long-term climate impact projections at a local scale. Due to this, it becomes more difficult to plan climate-resilient projects. For example, the Haor (wetland) areas in [north-eastern] Bangladesh usually experience flash flood in mid-May. But in 2017, the region had flash floods three weeks earlier, when around a million farmers were waiting to harvest their only crop. Two million tons of foodgrains were damaged. If we had known about this possibility, we may have advised farmers to sow crops that mature faster.

Friday, December 20, 2019

3 pbs

 

Fazle Hasan Abed

Founder and Chairperson
BRAC (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee)

Fazle Hasan Abed claims he is no miracle worker, but most of his colleagues would dispute that. Almost single-handedly, he has helped one of the world's poorest countries — Bangladesh — provide better health care for all its citizens. As founder and chairperson of BRAC (formerly known as the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee), Abed has garnered international attention for creating what many experts deem the most effective non-governmental organization [NGO] in the world.

Abed began his pioneering work in 1972, following Bangladesh's war of independence from Pakistan. "We were determined to bring about changes in the lives of poor people," he says. "We felt that whatever we do, we should try and replicate it throughout the nation if we can." Since then, BRAC has fought against poverty, disease, child mortality, and illiteracy by empowering poor rural women through bringing health care and education to their communities.

Scientists working in Bangladesh in the early 1970s had learned that a measured combination of sugar, salt, and water could prevent deaths from dehydration. Since our bodies are 70 percent water, it is dehydration that makes diarrhea the cause of 18 percent of child deaths worldwide. Abed's first major goal for BRAC was to teach mothers to make the lifesaving oral-rehydration solutions. "That involved going to every household in rural Bangladesh — 13 million households," Abed recalls. "And it took 10 years to do it." As a result, BRAC's oral-rehydration program reduced infant and child mortality from 258 deaths per 1,000 to 75 deaths per 1,000.

The majority of Bangladeshis are Muslim, and Abed realized that within each community, women would be most effective in teaching other women, many of whom were not permitted to leave their courtyards. But first, he realized, he had to win over their husbands and the male village chiefs, who would have to give their consent for any such community-wide activity. Achieving good health meant enlisting the political will of those in power. In the two decades since, women have made some gains in gender power in Bangladesh, and BRAC has helped to educate many men on the need for women to be educated and involved in health care and economic activities.

Today, BRAC is active in more than 68,000 villages and has 4.8 million group members. Abed introduced programs and initiatives that have enabled 3.8 million women, who are still the backbone of BRAC's organization, to establish village microfinance organizations that have to this point disbursed more than $1 billion in loans. These loans have allowed women to create small businesses poultry farming, cow rearing, and dairy farming; in addition the production of iodized salt, which helps prevent goiter, is now also possible. Such BRAC enterprises provide 80 percent of the organization's operating costs, with the rest coming from external donors. BRAC also works to control tuberculosis, with a major grant from the Global Fund for Tuberculosis, Malaria and AIDS. Over the years, one of BRAC's most critical contributions has been keeping poor rural children in school, and the organization now runs 31,000 one-room, one-teacher schools.

Abed's adept and tireless leadership of BRAC has brought him international renown and numerous awards. In 2004, he was honored with the Gates Award for Global Health and the United National Development Program's Mahbub ul Huq Award for Outstanding Contribution in Human Development. As evidence of his success, there are now BRAC branches in Afghanistan and Sri Lanka. Abed's strategy has always been ambitious: "We thought nationally, worked locally, and looked for inspiration globally."

Return to Global Health Champions

3.1 1.2 abed obituary lancet

 Founder of BRAC. He was born in Baniachong village, in what is now Bangladesh, on April 27, 1936, and died of complications from glioblastoma in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Dec 20, 2019, aged 83 years. In the early years after the non-governmental organisation (NGO) BRAC was established in 1972, its Founder and Executive Director Sir Fazle Hasan Abed would travel for days to visit BRAC projects, spending hours speaking to people the agency was trying to assist. “He thought that was his responsibility and the responsibility of the organisation, that it should be working for the poor people and also women and disadvantaged groups”, said Mushtaque Chowdhury, who joined BRAC in 1977 and rose to be its Vice Chairperson before recently retiring. Abed would maintain that focus on the least advantaged, even as BRAC developed into one of the largest NGOs in the world, with programmes spanning public health, economic development, education, agriculture, and disaster relief. There is also a Dhaka-based BRAC University. “He has received many recognitions, but he never thought he should be remembered. He always felt that the work or the need of the people, that’s the legacy that he left for all of us to do”, said Kaosar Afsana, who began working with BRAC in 1992 and is now Professor at BRAC University’s James P Grant School of Public Health. Abed began on a very different career trajectory, studying naval architecture at the University of Glasgow in the UK before transferring to the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants in London. He joined Shell Pakistan after returning home in 1968, and soon became head of the finance division. In November, 1970, a cyclone hit East Pakistan, as the country was then known, killing an estimated 300000 people. Abed mounted a humanitarian response, using his house as a headquarters for meetings and for organising supplies. He was still coordinating relief efforts in March, 1971, when West Pakistan’s military launched attacks in East Pakistan, sparking a war that eventually led to Bangladesh’s independence. After the fighting ended in December, 1971, he returned to a country ravaged by the conflict. Abed, who had moved to London during the conflict, sold a flat he owned there and used the money to provide food and build houses for people as they returned. “I didn’t have much of a vision at that time”, he said in a 2014 interview. “It was just a survival question. How does Bangladesh survive in a country which is devastated, ruined by bombing?” Those early relief efforts guided Abed’s founding of BRAC. Lincoln Chen was working at the Cholera Research Laboratory, now the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), when the cyclone struck and joined Abed with his relief work. “You always knew what he was doing was important and that what he was doing had innovative characteristics, but there was nothing that at any one time suggested its ultimate success. It was persistence and dedication”, said Chen, who is now President of the China Medical Board. Abed “redefined the role of NGOs”, Chowdhury said, with his focus on innovation and evidence gathering. “He would constantly monitor and improve the programmes.” Chen pointed to an early BRAC project to teach Bangladeshi women how to mix oral rehydration fluid and administer it to children with diarrhoea. The effort initially met with limited success, until Abed decided to pay the trainers based on whether mothers remembered how to mix the solution. “He had unprecedented ambitions and encouraged innovations”, Chen said. “I think that’s really how he reached a lot of success.” Known for saying “Small is beautiful, but big is necessary”, Abed oversaw BRAC’s growth, introducing and expanding programmes, including one of the world’s earliest microfinance initiatives, which now serves 7·1 million clients. “One of the things that BRAC has done because of his philosophy is show that you have to work at scale if you really want to change the plight of the people”, said Chowdhury, who is also Professor of Clinical Population and Family Health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, New York, USA. Abed oversaw BRAC’s geographical expansion, from operating solely in Bangladesh to running projects in four other Asian countries and in six in sub-Saharan Africa. As BRAC grew, Abed recognised that he could not depend on donors for support. He introduced social enterprises, such as milk processing and fish farming, that now cover a substantial proportion of BRAC’s operating costs. “That reflects his vision, that he would think BRAC will eventually need these resources and to be starting these small industries”, said Shams El Arifeen, the Senior Director of the Maternal and Child Health Division at icddr,b. “I cannot imagine what this country would have been without BRAC.” Abed leaves his wife, Sarwat Abed, daughter, Tamara, son, Shameran, and three grandchildren. Andrew Green

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

2

 ifpri s washington's  sdg 2 global hunger institute - hosted 6 2020 food conferences 1995 dc  , 2001 germany , 2004 uganda, 2007 beijing, 2011 delhi, 2014 addis ababa eyhiopia - sir fazle was on the advisory committee of the final 2014 conference along with experts footnoted

abed also contributed to book: the poorest and the hungry published 2009

  • Chapter 27 - Microfinance Interventions to Enable the Poorest to Improve Their Asset Base
    Fazle Hasan Abed


International Advisory Committee

Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, Founder & Chairperson, Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee

(BRAC), Bangladesh

Mr. Aly Abou‐Sabaa, Sector Operations Vice President, Governance, Agriculture and Human

Development, African Development Bank, Côte d’Ivoire

Hon. Dr. Akin Adesina, Minister of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Ministry of Agriculture

and Natural Resources, Nigeria

Ms. Lystra Antoine, Director for Agriculture Development, DuPont Pioneer, USA

Mr. Tom Arnold, Concern Worldwide’s Special Representative for Hunger and Director

General, Institute of International and European Affairs, Ireland

Dr. Christopher Barrett, Stephen B. and Janice G. Ashley Professor of Applied Economics and

Management, Cornell University, USA

Ms. Catherine Bertini, Co‐chair, The Chicago Council Initiative on Global Agricultural

Development, USA

Ms. Paula Chalinder, Head of Profession, Livelihoods, Department for International

Development (DFID), United Kingdom

Dr. Shenggen Fan, Director General, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA

H.E. Ato Newai Gebre‐ab, Chief Economic Advisor to the Prime Minister and Executive

Director of the Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI), Ethiopia

Dr. Marion Guillou, Chair of the Governing Board, Agreenium, France

Mr. Michael Hailu, Director, Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA),

The Netherlands

Dr. Franz Heidhues, Professor Emeritus, Center for Tropical Agriculture, University of

Hohenheim, Germany

Mr. Jeff Hill, Director for Policy, United States Agency for International Development

(USAID) Bureau for Food Security, USA

Hon. Dr. Agnes Kalibata, Minister of Agriculture and Animal Resources, Rwanda

Mr. Henock Kifle, Senior Adviser to the President, International Fund for Agricultural

Development (IFAD), Italy

Dr. Sergey Kiselev, Director, Eurasian Center for Food Security, Lomonosov Moscow State

University, Russian Federation

H.E. John Agyekum Kufuor, Former President, Republic of Ghana, Ghana

Mr. David Malone, Rector, United Nations University, Japan

Ms. Bonnie McClafferty, Director, Agriculture and Nutrition, Global Alliance for Improved

Nutrition (GAIN), USA

‐ 53 ‐

Mr. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public and Land‐grant Universities (APLU)

and Founding Co‐Chair, Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa, USA

Dr. Steven Were Omamo, Director, Policy Program, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa

(AGRA), Kenya

Dr. Martin Piñeiro, Director, Grupo Consultores en Economia y Organizacion, Argentina

Dr. Prabhu Pingali, Professor and Founding Director, Tata‐Cornell Agriculture and Nutrition

Initiative, Cornell University, USA

Dr. Per Pinstrup‐Andersen, H.E. Babcock Professor of Food and Nutrition Policy, Cornell

University, USA

Dr. Hans‐Joachim Preuss, Managing Director, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale

Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), Germany

Mr. Jaidev Shroff, Chief Executive Officer, UPL Limited, India

Ms. Kathy Spahn, President and Chief Executive Officer, Helen Keller International, USA

Dr. M. S. Swaminathan, Emeritus Chairman and Chief Mentor, M. S. Swaminathan Research

Foundation, India

Mr. Stephan Tanda, Executive Managing Board Director, Royal DSM N.V., The Netherlands

Dr. Greg Traxler, Senior Program Officer, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USA

Prof. Joachim von Braun, Director, Department of Economic and Technological Change,

Center for Development Research (ZEF), Germany

Dr. Emorn Udomkesmalee (Wasantwisut), Senior Advisor, Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol

University, Thailand

Sunday, December 1, 2019

2.6 continuing abed advancement goal s asia

 

with economistfood.com

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

CONFERENCE HASHTAG: #D4N2021

COVID-19 has disrupted health systems, nutrition services, and food systems around the world, including South Asia.  Research-based evidence and programmatic experiences are essential to support stakeholders to restore services and re-orient programs and policies to support better nutrition outcomes.

We, a consortium of co-hosts from around South Asia, are pleased to announce a virtual conference on ‘Delivering for Nutrition (D4N) in South Asia: Implementation Research in the Context of COVID-19’ on December 1-2, 2021. D4N 2021 aims to bring together evidence that can inform and support policy and program initiatives in South Asia to prioritize and improve maternal and child nutrition during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

With this overarching purpose, the key objectives are to:

  • Share evidence of the impact of COVID-19 on maternal and child nutrition
  • Highlight adaptations to support implementation of health and nutrition interventions and social safety net programs
  • Identify lessons learned from implementing programs to support maternal and child nutrition during the pandemic

We are inviting abstracts on research studies and implementation experiences, explicitly focused on COVID-19, and related to:

  • Implementation, coverage, and quality of maternal and child health and nutrition interventions/programs
  • Implementation, coverage and quality of social safety net programs
  • Impacts on infant and young child feeding practices, diet quality, food security, nutritional status or other outcomes
  • Other relevant implementation or research on nutrition and COVID-19

Thematic sessions will be based on selected oral and poster presentations. The Call for Abstracts is now closed. For any questions, please contact IFPRI-D4N-Conf@cgiar.org.

CO-HOSTS

List of co-hosts:

  • Aga Khan University (Pakistan)
  • Alive & Thrive (India)
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) (India)
  • Helen Keller International (HKI) (Nepal)
  • IDinsight (South Asia)
  • Institute of Policy Studies (IPS) (Sri Lanka)
  • International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) (Bangladesh)
  • International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) (South Asia)
  • National Institute of Nutrition (NIN) (India)
  • NITI Aayog (India)
  • SickKids Centre for Global Child Health (South Asia)
  • Standing Together for Nutrition (STfN) (Global)
  • Society for Implementation Science in Nutrition (SISN) (Global)
  • UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA) (Regional)
  • World Health Organization South-East Asian Regional Office (WHO-SEARO) (Regional)
  • World Bank South Asia (Regional)

 DELIVERING4NUTRITION 2020