DAY I ALMOST CHOKED EATING SUSHI WITH FAZLE ABED; he was telling the story- my greatest mistake was spending my life savings on building homes for 100000 refugees. Being an engineer I knew how to do that. But as we were opening the meta-village a young lady came up to me : what education/enterprises do we need to prevent dozens of girls dying every week? So she & I learnt we needed to innovate 5 last mile services for any space girls are born- safe homes, education, health, food, finance; in searching we soon found a billion village mothers wanting to COLLAB. ..mothers 1
Download 2-page guide ...consider cases of new nations after world war 2- how many cases lived up to the peoples simplest dreams, end poverty, food/health/safety for every family member, education geared to decent jobs and happiness? bangladesh did something different- empowering 90% of women to find partners in building their own communities- .over 50 years a new economic model emerged which a billion asian women applied to end extreme poverty- how?.sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communitY 1 PLATFORMS 1 PLATFORMS 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
examples from abed builder of largest ngo partnership: Reeta Roy MCF 3.3 1billion$ to vaccinate continent africa 4.3 uganda; Soros 1.1-1.6 ineteconomics bottom-up, 4.4 new university OSUN 3.4 end TB; Gates 1.1-1.6 digital finance; 2.1-2.6 extending mpesa in tanzania's green revolution; world bank 1.3 first 100 ultra poor nations co-researchers, 4,4 first 100 nations early childhood play co-researchers
in contrast tu unicorns, we define hunicorns as billion dollar startup networks to valuable to human life for exiting investors or quarrelsome political parties -hall of fame first 1000 hunicorn collabs with sir fazle abed

36 alumni networks for sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communities 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
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...2016 bangladesh e-digital schools nationwide :: bangla video:::: brookings video:: :::brac how did this happen?
The Economist 1977

2020s earthlings have the great good fortune that over 50 years from 1970 to 2019, fazle abed helped 1 billion asian women end poverty through 6 connected community building networks celebrating the first 5 sdgs and youth mediating everything else to be first sdg generation -each with a collaboration legacy -we're here to help yu find the network you can most help empower further
ending poverty, celebrating sustainability goals & youthful community building = most enjoyable ways to network; fazle abed (oil company engineer inspired by franciscan values) helped billion asian mothers do this over 50 years - join most exciting action learning networks and lets map AI algorithms = optimal livesmatter community builders -2021 join in glasgow cop26 & dubai rewired greatest youth meetings ever with thanks to abed.games youthmarkets.com & worldrecordjobs.com
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Which 30 educational and economic partnerships most empower a billion women to end extreme poverty, and value their children’s sustainability? Fortunately for those caring about sustainability 2020s, we can map this by around partners and alumni of 50 years of servant leadership by fazle abed 1970-2019 together with legacy specifications mapped through his final decade

Viewed from 1970, Increasing life expectancy from 25 years below to average helped gravitate development economics world’s most trusted partnership – hence sustainability last mile service markets

3) last mile health
2) agriculture for village food security


4)non-linear livelihood education
5) timing what platforms partners could facilitate entrepreneurial revolution not not just inclusive community but cooperation in full and meaningful entrepreneurial employment

financial entreprenurial revolution for nation's people history excluded from machine age


Friday, December 20, 2019

3 pbs

 

Fazle Hasan Abed

Founder and Chairperson
BRAC (Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee)

Fazle Hasan Abed claims he is no miracle worker, but most of his colleagues would dispute that. Almost single-handedly, he has helped one of the world's poorest countries — Bangladesh — provide better health care for all its citizens. As founder and chairperson of BRAC (formerly known as the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee), Abed has garnered international attention for creating what many experts deem the most effective non-governmental organization [NGO] in the world.

Abed began his pioneering work in 1972, following Bangladesh's war of independence from Pakistan. "We were determined to bring about changes in the lives of poor people," he says. "We felt that whatever we do, we should try and replicate it throughout the nation if we can." Since then, BRAC has fought against poverty, disease, child mortality, and illiteracy by empowering poor rural women through bringing health care and education to their communities.

Scientists working in Bangladesh in the early 1970s had learned that a measured combination of sugar, salt, and water could prevent deaths from dehydration. Since our bodies are 70 percent water, it is dehydration that makes diarrhea the cause of 18 percent of child deaths worldwide. Abed's first major goal for BRAC was to teach mothers to make the lifesaving oral-rehydration solutions. "That involved going to every household in rural Bangladesh — 13 million households," Abed recalls. "And it took 10 years to do it." As a result, BRAC's oral-rehydration program reduced infant and child mortality from 258 deaths per 1,000 to 75 deaths per 1,000.

The majority of Bangladeshis are Muslim, and Abed realized that within each community, women would be most effective in teaching other women, many of whom were not permitted to leave their courtyards. But first, he realized, he had to win over their husbands and the male village chiefs, who would have to give their consent for any such community-wide activity. Achieving good health meant enlisting the political will of those in power. In the two decades since, women have made some gains in gender power in Bangladesh, and BRAC has helped to educate many men on the need for women to be educated and involved in health care and economic activities.

Today, BRAC is active in more than 68,000 villages and has 4.8 million group members. Abed introduced programs and initiatives that have enabled 3.8 million women, who are still the backbone of BRAC's organization, to establish village microfinance organizations that have to this point disbursed more than $1 billion in loans. These loans have allowed women to create small businesses poultry farming, cow rearing, and dairy farming; in addition the production of iodized salt, which helps prevent goiter, is now also possible. Such BRAC enterprises provide 80 percent of the organization's operating costs, with the rest coming from external donors. BRAC also works to control tuberculosis, with a major grant from the Global Fund for Tuberculosis, Malaria and AIDS. Over the years, one of BRAC's most critical contributions has been keeping poor rural children in school, and the organization now runs 31,000 one-room, one-teacher schools.

Abed's adept and tireless leadership of BRAC has brought him international renown and numerous awards. In 2004, he was honored with the Gates Award for Global Health and the United National Development Program's Mahbub ul Huq Award for Outstanding Contribution in Human Development. As evidence of his success, there are now BRAC branches in Afghanistan and Sri Lanka. Abed's strategy has always been ambitious: "We thought nationally, worked locally, and looked for inspiration globally."

Return to Global Health Champions

3.1 1.2 abed obituary lancet

 Founder of BRAC. He was born in Baniachong village, in what is now Bangladesh, on April 27, 1936, and died of complications from glioblastoma in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Dec 20, 2019, aged 83 years. In the early years after the non-governmental organisation (NGO) BRAC was established in 1972, its Founder and Executive Director Sir Fazle Hasan Abed would travel for days to visit BRAC projects, spending hours speaking to people the agency was trying to assist. “He thought that was his responsibility and the responsibility of the organisation, that it should be working for the poor people and also women and disadvantaged groups”, said Mushtaque Chowdhury, who joined BRAC in 1977 and rose to be its Vice Chairperson before recently retiring. Abed would maintain that focus on the least advantaged, even as BRAC developed into one of the largest NGOs in the world, with programmes spanning public health, economic development, education, agriculture, and disaster relief. There is also a Dhaka-based BRAC University. “He has received many recognitions, but he never thought he should be remembered. He always felt that the work or the need of the people, that’s the legacy that he left for all of us to do”, said Kaosar Afsana, who began working with BRAC in 1992 and is now Professor at BRAC University’s James P Grant School of Public Health. Abed began on a very different career trajectory, studying naval architecture at the University of Glasgow in the UK before transferring to the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants in London. He joined Shell Pakistan after returning home in 1968, and soon became head of the finance division. In November, 1970, a cyclone hit East Pakistan, as the country was then known, killing an estimated 300000 people. Abed mounted a humanitarian response, using his house as a headquarters for meetings and for organising supplies. He was still coordinating relief efforts in March, 1971, when West Pakistan’s military launched attacks in East Pakistan, sparking a war that eventually led to Bangladesh’s independence. After the fighting ended in December, 1971, he returned to a country ravaged by the conflict. Abed, who had moved to London during the conflict, sold a flat he owned there and used the money to provide food and build houses for people as they returned. “I didn’t have much of a vision at that time”, he said in a 2014 interview. “It was just a survival question. How does Bangladesh survive in a country which is devastated, ruined by bombing?” Those early relief efforts guided Abed’s founding of BRAC. Lincoln Chen was working at the Cholera Research Laboratory, now the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), when the cyclone struck and joined Abed with his relief work. “You always knew what he was doing was important and that what he was doing had innovative characteristics, but there was nothing that at any one time suggested its ultimate success. It was persistence and dedication”, said Chen, who is now President of the China Medical Board. Abed “redefined the role of NGOs”, Chowdhury said, with his focus on innovation and evidence gathering. “He would constantly monitor and improve the programmes.” Chen pointed to an early BRAC project to teach Bangladeshi women how to mix oral rehydration fluid and administer it to children with diarrhoea. The effort initially met with limited success, until Abed decided to pay the trainers based on whether mothers remembered how to mix the solution. “He had unprecedented ambitions and encouraged innovations”, Chen said. “I think that’s really how he reached a lot of success.” Known for saying “Small is beautiful, but big is necessary”, Abed oversaw BRAC’s growth, introducing and expanding programmes, including one of the world’s earliest microfinance initiatives, which now serves 7·1 million clients. “One of the things that BRAC has done because of his philosophy is show that you have to work at scale if you really want to change the plight of the people”, said Chowdhury, who is also Professor of Clinical Population and Family Health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, New York, USA. Abed oversaw BRAC’s geographical expansion, from operating solely in Bangladesh to running projects in four other Asian countries and in six in sub-Saharan Africa. As BRAC grew, Abed recognised that he could not depend on donors for support. He introduced social enterprises, such as milk processing and fish farming, that now cover a substantial proportion of BRAC’s operating costs. “That reflects his vision, that he would think BRAC will eventually need these resources and to be starting these small industries”, said Shams El Arifeen, the Senior Director of the Maternal and Child Health Division at icddr,b. “I cannot imagine what this country would have been without BRAC.” Abed leaves his wife, Sarwat Abed, daughter, Tamara, son, Shameran, and three grandchildren. Andrew Green

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

2

 ifpri s washington's  sdg 2 global hunger institute - hosted 6 2020 food conferences 1995 dc  , 2001 germany , 2004 uganda, 2007 beijing, 2011 delhi, 2014 addis ababa eyhiopia - sir fazle was on the advisory committee of the final 2014 conference along with experts footnoted

abed also contributed to book: the poorest and the hungry published 2009

  • Chapter 27 - Microfinance Interventions to Enable the Poorest to Improve Their Asset Base
    Fazle Hasan Abed


International Advisory Committee

Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, Founder & Chairperson, Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee

(BRAC), Bangladesh

Mr. Aly Abou‐Sabaa, Sector Operations Vice President, Governance, Agriculture and Human

Development, African Development Bank, Côte d’Ivoire

Hon. Dr. Akin Adesina, Minister of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Ministry of Agriculture

and Natural Resources, Nigeria

Ms. Lystra Antoine, Director for Agriculture Development, DuPont Pioneer, USA

Mr. Tom Arnold, Concern Worldwide’s Special Representative for Hunger and Director

General, Institute of International and European Affairs, Ireland

Dr. Christopher Barrett, Stephen B. and Janice G. Ashley Professor of Applied Economics and

Management, Cornell University, USA

Ms. Catherine Bertini, Co‐chair, The Chicago Council Initiative on Global Agricultural

Development, USA

Ms. Paula Chalinder, Head of Profession, Livelihoods, Department for International

Development (DFID), United Kingdom

Dr. Shenggen Fan, Director General, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA

H.E. Ato Newai Gebre‐ab, Chief Economic Advisor to the Prime Minister and Executive

Director of the Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI), Ethiopia

Dr. Marion Guillou, Chair of the Governing Board, Agreenium, France

Mr. Michael Hailu, Director, Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA),

The Netherlands

Dr. Franz Heidhues, Professor Emeritus, Center for Tropical Agriculture, University of

Hohenheim, Germany

Mr. Jeff Hill, Director for Policy, United States Agency for International Development

(USAID) Bureau for Food Security, USA

Hon. Dr. Agnes Kalibata, Minister of Agriculture and Animal Resources, Rwanda

Mr. Henock Kifle, Senior Adviser to the President, International Fund for Agricultural

Development (IFAD), Italy

Dr. Sergey Kiselev, Director, Eurasian Center for Food Security, Lomonosov Moscow State

University, Russian Federation

H.E. John Agyekum Kufuor, Former President, Republic of Ghana, Ghana

Mr. David Malone, Rector, United Nations University, Japan

Ms. Bonnie McClafferty, Director, Agriculture and Nutrition, Global Alliance for Improved

Nutrition (GAIN), USA

‐ 53 ‐

Mr. Peter McPherson, President, Association of Public and Land‐grant Universities (APLU)

and Founding Co‐Chair, Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa, USA

Dr. Steven Were Omamo, Director, Policy Program, Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa

(AGRA), Kenya

Dr. Martin Piñeiro, Director, Grupo Consultores en Economia y Organizacion, Argentina

Dr. Prabhu Pingali, Professor and Founding Director, Tata‐Cornell Agriculture and Nutrition

Initiative, Cornell University, USA

Dr. Per Pinstrup‐Andersen, H.E. Babcock Professor of Food and Nutrition Policy, Cornell

University, USA

Dr. Hans‐Joachim Preuss, Managing Director, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale

Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), Germany

Mr. Jaidev Shroff, Chief Executive Officer, UPL Limited, India

Ms. Kathy Spahn, President and Chief Executive Officer, Helen Keller International, USA

Dr. M. S. Swaminathan, Emeritus Chairman and Chief Mentor, M. S. Swaminathan Research

Foundation, India

Mr. Stephan Tanda, Executive Managing Board Director, Royal DSM N.V., The Netherlands

Dr. Greg Traxler, Senior Program Officer, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, USA

Prof. Joachim von Braun, Director, Department of Economic and Technological Change,

Center for Development Research (ZEF), Germany

Dr. Emorn Udomkesmalee (Wasantwisut), Senior Advisor, Institute of Nutrition, Mahidol

University, Thailand

Wednesday, July 31, 2019

1.4 brac bank tara

 bracbank has a special division for women entrepreneurs TARA

example training program

BRAC Bank TARA in partnership with American Babson College and Dutch FMO has successfully completed the first-of-its-kind entrepreneurial skill development training for women business owners.

BRAC Bank TARA organized a gala celebration ceremony to honour the women entrepreneurs as they completed the country's first ever international entrepreneurial development training programme by Babson College, an entrepreneurial powerhouse often ranked as the most prestigious entrepreneurship college in the US, and FMO, a Dutch financial investment firm specializing in financing businesses and projects.

The training is aimed at facilitating women entrepreneurs in developing and enriching entrepreneurial and managerial skills in order to help them expand and sustain their businesses in the long run.

Professor Vincent Chang, Vice Chancellor of BRAC University; attended the gala ceremony as the Chief Guest at LakeShore Hotel on July 9. Ms. Lila Rashid, General Manager, SME & Special Programmes Department, Bangladesh Bank; Professor Patricia G. Greene from Babson College; Mr. Evangelos Alamaniotis, Investment Officer; and Mr. David Hernandez Velazquez, Investment Officer, FMO; Selim R. F. Hussain, Managing Director & CEO; Chowdhury Akhtar Asif, Deputy Managing Director & CRO; and Syed Abdul Momen, Head of SME Banking, and Nazmur Rahim, Head of Retail Banking; BRAC Bank, our valued customers and stakeholders attended the ceremony.

A total of 35 women businesswomen participated in the extensive training during July 3-4 and July 8-9, 2019. Mr. Richard T. Bliss, PhD, Babson College, Professor of Finance and National Academic Director - 10,000 Small Businesses and Professor Patricia G. Greene, Academic Director, Babson College, conducted the training. They also conducted two-day Train The Trainer session to groom in-house trainers during June 30-July 1, 2019.

The exclusive training was a signature initiative of TARA that will help enhance loyalty and establish TARA as the industry's best women's banking proposition. We will continue such local and international partnerships to organize more capacity building programs for our customers.

With its innovation and engagement, TARA will continue to create new economic opportunities for women in Bangladesh.

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

4.3 teens skills

 Last modified on Wednesday, 24 July 2019 00:00

BRAC trained 400 thousand youths in employable skills

No less than 400 thousand youths, a large portion of which is women, received training in a number of employable skills in non-agriculture sector from BRAC in last eight years and have found decent employment or started own initiatives.

BRAC officials revealed this information at an event today on Tuesday (23 July 2019) at the BRAC Centre in Dhaka. BRAC organised this event as a part of its celebration of World Youth Skills Day. The programme comprised an exhibition of BRAC skills development initiatives, launch of a publication titled “Star Toolkit: Introducing a Successful Entrepreneurship” and a series of panel discussions.

Faruque Hossain, chairman, National Skills Development Authority, was present as the chief guest at the panel discussion titled “SDG-8: Youth, skills and employment”. Tapan Kumar Ghosh, chairman, Bureau of Non-formal Education, and KAM Morshed, director, BRAC, participated in the discussion among others. Asif Saleh, acting executive director, BRAC, moderated the discussion.

Angela Naumann, first secretary, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian High Commission, Bangladesh, Mashfique Ibne Akbar, private sector development adviser, Department of International Development, British High Commission, Dhaka, Zhigang Li, social sector specialist, Asian Development Bank, Tomoo Hozomi, country representative, UNICEF Bangladesh, participated in another panel discussion on financing of skills development initiatives.

BRAC Skills Development Programme is currently working with focus on three areas, namely, skills training and other services, systems change with the government and industry partnerships, and community engagement. At present it is operating eight projects focusing on the communities living in the cities, municipalities and Rohingyas and host community in Cox’s Bazar. These current projects are: Skills training for advancing resources (STAR), Promoting skills and productivity enhancement for resilience (PROSPER), Promoting business Incubation for small entrepreneurs (PROMISE), Pro-poor growth of rural enter-prises through sustainable skills-development (PROGRESS), Alternative learning programme for out of school adolescents (ALP), Partnership reinforcement for integrated skills enhancement (PRISE), Skills development project for Rohingyas, and Apprenticeship-based training for host community.

BRAC’s Skill Development Programme began its activities with the STAR project, which has developed a unique model reforming and institutionalising the ancient tradition of skills training through apprenticeships under a master craftsman. Under STAR project, BRAC officials find out skilled people who run their own business. After they go through specially designed training, selected trainees start apprenticeships under them. The trainers receive an honorarium for running the six-monthly course. This model on one hand creates opportunity for underprivileged youths for quality skill training, while helps keep costs low compared with institution-based training. After finishing apprenticeships, BRAC assists the youths to get decent jobs or start their own business.

Under the STAR project, BRAC trained 30 thousand youths up to December 2018. Of them 95 per cent found decent employment. For women trainees the impact is even bigger, reducing child marriage 65 per cent. Post training, the apprentices saw six times increase in both income and employment.

BRAC developed this unique model jointly with ILO, UNICEF, Department of Non-Formal Education of Bangladesh government and follows the National Technical and Vocational Quality Framework (NTVQF).

The experts at the panel discussions stressed effective collaboration between the government, donors, non-governmental actors and private sector for expanding the opportunities for employable skills development. They said to achieve SDG targets there is no alternative for skill development.

BRAC established Skill Development Programme with a socio-economic background of an increasing youth population, large gap in employable skills and training, risky migration of unskilled and semi-skilled labour force, increasing violence against girls and women, and expansion of urban spaces and their population.

Targeting both the domestic and overseas labour market, BRAC is currently giving 15 kinds of skills training in non-agriculture sector, which are: Tailoring and dress making, mobile phone servicing, wooden furniture making, beauty salon, refrigeration and AC servicing, basic electronics, graphic design, IT support technician, aluminum fabrication, motorcycle servicing, wooden furniture designing, electrical house wiring, block and batik, screen printing, jori and chumki work.

Friday, March 15, 2019

oral rehydration 3.1

 paul romer free the market for lowest cost live saving ideas

Nov 5, 2007 — In the summer of 2007, I interviewed Paul Romer of Stanford University ... Some kinds of ideas, we might want to treat like oral rehydration ...
by CI Jones2019Cited by 42 — Romer developed endogenous growth theory, emphasizing that ... Consider oral rehydration therapy, one of Romer's favorite examples.
25 pages
by CI Jones2015Cited by 1 — The essential contribution of Romer (1990) is its clear ... As an example, consider oral rehydration therapy, one of Romer's favorite exam-.
3 pages

Thursday, April 18, 2019  https://www.cfr.org/event/simple-solution-saved-fifty-four-million-lives

Dr. David Nalin and Dr. Richard Cash at the Council on Foreign Relations
Speakers
Dr. Richard Cash

Senior Lecturer, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Dr. David Nalin

Professor Emeritus, Center for Immunology and Microbial Diseases, Albany Medical College

Presider

Senior Fellow for Global Health, Economics, and Development and Director of the Global Health Program, Council on Foreign Relations

In 1968, two recent U.S. medical school graduates working in Dhaka, Bangladesh, developed oral rehydration solution—a mixture of water, sugar, and salt—that the British medical journal the Lancet has hailed “potentially the most important medical advance of the twentieth century.” These two doctors, Richard Cash, senior lecturer in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and David Nalin, professor emeritus at the Center for Immunology and Microbial Diseases at Albany Medical College, discussed the fifty-year legacy of their invention and the lessons that legacy offers to the health challenges emerging in lower income nations today.

https://www.cfr.org/event/simple-solution-saved-fifty-four-million-lives

Dr. David Nalin and Dr. Richard Cash at the Council on Foreign Relations
Speakers
Dr. Richard Cash

Senior Lecturer, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Dr. David Nalin

Professor Emeritus, Center for Immunology and Microbial Diseases, Albany Medical College

Presider

Senior Fellow for Global Health, Economics, and Development and Director of the Global Health Program, Council on Foreign Relations

In 1968, two recent U.S. medical school graduates working in Dhaka, Bangladesh, developed oral rehydration solution—a mixture of water, sugar, and salt—that the British medical journal the Lancet has hailed “potentially the most important medical advance of the twentieth century.” These two doctors, Richard Cash, senior lecturer in the Department of Global Health and Population at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and David Nalin, professor emeritus at the Center for Immunology and Microbial Diseases at Albany Medical College, discussed the fifty-year legacy of their invention and the lessons that legacy offers to the health challenges emerging in lower income nations today.

https://www.cfr.org/event/simple-solution-saved-fifty-four-million-lives