download one page tour to 50 years of building partners empowering Asian village women to end poverty, design last mile health service and much more- how brac became the ngo world's largest networking economy DAY I ALMOST CHOKED EATING SUSHI WITH FAZLE ABED; he was telling his story: Bangladesh was less than 1 year old- it was 1972 and wanting to do more that being young Asia's leading oil company ceo, his greatest mistake was spending his life savings on building homes for 100000 refugees. Being an engineer I knew how to do that. But as we were opening the meta-village a young lady came up to me : what education/village enterprises do we need to prevent dozens of girls starving every week and scores of infants dying from dehydration? So she & I learnt we needed to innovate 5 last mile services for any space girls are born- safe homes, education, health, food, finance; in searching we found a billion village mothers wanting to COLLAB. ..video 1
Download 2-page guide ...consider cases of new nations after world war 2- how many cases lived up to the peoples simplest dreams, end poverty, food/health/safety for every family member, education geared to decent jobs and happiness? bangladesh did something different- empowering 90% of women to find partners in building their own communities- .over 50 years a new economic model emerged which a billion asian women applied to end extreme poverty- how?.sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communitY 1 PLATFORMS 1 PLATFORMS 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
examples from abed builder of largest ngo partnership: Reeta Roy MCF 3.3 1billion$ to vaccinate continent africa 4.3 uganda; Soros 1.1-1.6 ineteconomics bottom-up, 4.4 new university OSUN 3.4 end TB; Gates 1.1-1.6 digital finance; 2.1-2.6 extending mpesa in tanzania's green revolution; world bank 1.3 first 100 ultra poor nations co-researchers, 4,4 first 100 nations early childhood play co-researchers
in contrast tu unicorns, we define hunicorns as billion dollar startup networks to valuable to human life for exiting investors or quarrelsome political parties -hall of fame first 1000 hunicorn collabs with sir fazle abed

36 alumni networks for sustainability generation goal 5 100% livesmatter communities 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6; 4 livelihood edu for all 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 ref Safiqul Islam 3 last mile health services 3.1 3,2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 last mile nutrition 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2,6 banking for all workers 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 .
..
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...2016 bangladesh e-digital schools nationwide :: bangla video:::: brookings video:: :::brac how did this happen?
The Economist 1977

2020s earthlings have the great good fortune that over 50 years from 1970 to 2019, fazle abed helped 1 billion asian women end poverty through 6 connected community building networks celebrating the first 5 sdgs and youth mediating everything else to be first sdg generation -each with a collaboration legacy -we're here to help yu find the network you can most help empower further
ending poverty, celebrating sustainability goals & youthful community building = most enjoyable ways to network; fazle abed (oil company engineer inspired by franciscan values) helped billion asian mothers do this over 50 years - join most exciting action learning networks and lets map AI algorithms = optimal livesmatter community builders -2021 join in glasgow cop26 & dubai rewired greatest youth meetings ever with thanks to abed.games youthmarkets.com & worldrecordjobs.com
xx

Which 30 educational and economic partnerships most empower a billion women to end extreme poverty, and value their children’s sustainability? Fortunately for those caring about sustainability 2020s, we can map this by around partners and alumni of 50 years of servant leadership by fazle abed 1970-2019 together with legacy specifications mapped through his final decade

Viewed from 1970, Increasing life expectancy from 25 years below to average helped gravitate development economics world’s most trusted partnership – hence sustainability last mile service markets

3) last mile health
2) agriculture for village food security


4)non-linear livelihood education
5) timing what platforms partners could facilitate entrepreneurial revolution not not just inclusive community but cooperation in full and meaningful entrepreneurial employment

financial entreprenurial revolution for nation's people history excluded from machine age


Saturday, July 31, 2021

2.4 brac poultry leads to 14+ brac national enterprises 2.6

 although chickens for laying eggs is cited as one of the most typical small enterprises supported by village microfinance all over the developing world , there is noting typical about brac chicken/poultry -not the least in terms of resiliency stories

over more than 20 years multiple components businesses came together to form a total village to national market supply chain - brac calls such total value leadership models brac enterprises- and we regard brac poultry as a, if not the, benchmark case to understand value chain leadership linking one village to 100000 villages to national market leader and global exemplar

in the journal of social business we have noted inter alia:

poultry is the source of over a million micofranchised enterprises- positive cash flow earnedby village women

villagers play mainly one of 5 roles only one of which is maintaining a village's chickens for laying eggs

the 4 other main components that interlock/:

breeding superchickens

vet services for chiekens - laying 5 to 10 times more eggs than the traditional scrawny village chicken these birds do need more expert attention

chicken feed - with such a huge bird population to feed abed was concerned to mimimise use of land that could grow human food- one answer used both for chicken feed and mulberry bushes for silk rearing was utilisation of road-side land not suited for human food cultivation 

coordinating distribution beyond the village now that more eggs were being procced than villagers needed 

https://www.brac.net/images/Chicken_Factsheet.pdf this factsheet shows how the complete model including chicken for national consumption came together in 2004 as a lead case for what have become bracs 14 national enterprises -http://www.brac.net/brac-enterprise



we date brac chicken as mainly coming together as a leader of the whole pultry value chain in our 3rd dedade of brac 1992-2002 which is also when brac began to add nationwide capabilities to what over its first quarter of a century connected mainly village fieldworkers -it was onlt from 1996 that tech partners came to bangladesh villages in mo0bile and solar - up until 1996 village/rural meant being cut off without access to electricity grids or indeed any of the advances since 1760 of the age of machines and humans- banglsdesh and asian village empowerment has had a lot of leapfroging to do in what is brac's 2nd quarter of a century as fazle abed's last with his death in dec 2019

quoting from brac chicken factsheet:

In the late 1970s, BRAC identified poultry rearing as a source of income for the landless, particularly the destitute women. However, local chickens were generally undernourished and meat and egg yields were poor in villages. In the early 1980s BRAC partnered in a participatory action research programme aimed at increasing the productivity of small flocks of hens in village conditions and to develop a replicable smallholder model, the success of which led to the development of the national broiler chicken industry. The model involved women in a chain of activities as vaccinators, hatchery operators, chicken rearers, feed sellers, producers of hatching eggs and as producers of eggs for the market. Credit as well as marketing was integrated into the model. Over time, BRAC social enterprises were set up to facilitate each of these activities. 

BRAC Chicken, established in 2004, was the final link within this chain. The enterprise was established to meet growing demands for dressed chicken in large metropolitan areas, by purchasing chickens from BRAC’s poultry rearing farms, other commercial farms, and rural farmers. BRAC Chicken Worker weighing chicken before it is sent for processing A BRAC Social Enterprise Driving growth in the poultry sector by increasing the supply of processed broiler meat BRAC Chicken today With the only automated plant of its kind in Bangladesh, the enterprise currently processes approximately 10,000 birds per day, which are sourced from a large number of independent rural farmers. The plant purchases chickens from BRAC’s commercial broiler farms and independent farmers, and sells the dressed meat to a variety of customers including large restaurants, hotels, supermarkets and even individual households. Given that the demand for poultry meat and eggs still exceeds the supply, our poultry operations remain an important source of support for rural farmers while driving growth in the sector and increasing the supply of high-yield variety chicks and processed broiler meat

======================================

-please see footnote for list of brac 14 enterprises

1 seed and agro enterprises 3.1,3.2 (core value chain dev 1972=2001)

2 sericulture from 78 - an inspiring compoent of brac 3.3 crafts whose enterprise is called 

3 aarong overall crafts merchandising

4 brac salt - original motivations to combat iodine defiency od all and various added deficiencies of children started iut of cox's bazaar 2001

5 brac chicken 3.4

6 brac dairy - formally stsrted in 1998 abed tells stories of timing of when to start dried milk production vital- had to wait til eu hadstpopped dumping- this enterprise also led to

7 brac artificial insemination

8 brac delivery kits qnd sanitary towels- maternal delivery kit production/distribution started 1998 - the enterprise took on different scale with amagamation of brac sanitary towels from 2004

9 brac cold storage

10 brac printing pack

11 brac fisheries although support for value chain of fish has been mapped by brac since 1976- the enterpruse formed in 2008 after successful piloting of brac fush farms

12 brac recycled handmade paper- while the value chain started in 2000 it became a full enterprise in 2009

13 brac forestry

14 to verify

world bank, dhaka branch,  jan 2015 

The ‘science of delivery’, or bringing the right kinds of services effectively to the poor, is the key to eradicate extreme poverty, said Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, the founder and chairman of BRAC, the world’s largest NGO. 


Image

The under-five child mortality in Bangladesh has decreased from 180 deaths per 1,000 live births in the 1980s to 53 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011. The child survival rate in Bangladesh has surpassed that in neighboring countries.

smail Ferdous/World Bank

While visiting the World Bank Bangladesh office, he shared how perfecting the science of delivery helps reduce poverty; saves lives; brings prosperity; and how one impact is linked with another.

In 1972 BRAC started working on integrated rural development in Bangladesh. The country had an alarmingly low child survival rate at the time. Diarrhea was among the leading causes of the death of children. BRAC took the lead in popularizing the Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) to prevent diarrhea. Bangladesh now has the world’s highest ORT usage rate. Thanks to ORT and the later success in child immunization, the under-five child mortality in Bangladesh has decreased from 180 deaths per 1,000 live births in the 1980s to 53 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011. The child survival rate in Bangladesh has surpassed that in neighboring countries.

A mother needs boiled water, sugar and salt from her kitchen to prepare ORT. A simple solution, but the challenge was to reach the millions of mothers, teach them how to prepare the saline solution and ensure the proper feeding of sick children.

BRAC employed female health workers from the community to go door to door and teach mothers to prepare and administer ORT. The rural and often illiterate mother would need to remember 7 simple points of ORT.  The health workers used to mark their utensils to measure half a liter of water, adding a pinch of salt with the fingertips and a fistful of molasses, a substitute to sugar in villages.

“BRACs methodology always focuses on strong monitoring mechanism to measure the progress of any intervention and maintain quality and accountability,” says Sir Abed. BRAC representatives would randomly monitor 10 percent of households. Each health worker received 10 Takas ($.12) per household if the mother could remember the 7 points of ORT accurately.

Unfortunately, the first round of monitoring showed a disappointing 6 percent household usage rate.  BRAC realized that the health workers themselves did not believe in the intervention. BRAC trained the health workers to show how ORT works. The new found belief in the intervention increased the usage rate to 19%, but still far below making a meaningful impact nationally.

Further analysis showed that men felt undermined by not being adequately engaged. BRAC workers started to engage the fathers. To cut time and cost by half, workers started teaching mothers in groups instead of an one on one basis and monitoring the monitors.  Meetings were organized in markets, schools and mosques to explain the benefits of ORT. National TV and radio launched a campaign to popularize ORT.  Once the whole village was mobilized, the results were remarkable.

Sir Abed said, “It involved several incremental steps to deliver the desirable service to the poor. First, making the program effective; second, refining the intervention based on the trial and error to make it efficient; and third, a focus on robust monitoring and accountability mechanism allowing the scaling up of the intervention nationwide.

Citing examples of interlinked development impacts, Sir Abed highlighted that the fertility rate among Bangladeshi women declined during the same period. Bangladesh today has almost achieved a replacement level fertility rate of 2.2 children per women.

The experience shows that through efficient delivery, simple local solutions can bring positive changes in the lives of millions. And to do so, we need to identify effective and available avenues of delivery, easy ways of scaling up the initiative, learn from the failures and rectify. We learn, at each stage, vigilant monitoring, impact assessment, and quick redesigns to improve the intervention.

The delivery mechanism in ORT initiative reconciles with many projects within the Bank to reach out to the poorest of the society.  This experience  can be applied to bring services to millions of people worldwide for poverty reduction and human development.

Bangladesh has shown remarkable progress through simple solutions as ORT. These efforts could be replicated as a model in any development project world-wide,” remarked Sir Abed ending his knowledge sharing with staff in the Dhaka office.

1.1 1.2 1billiongirls economic model transformed every system eg 3.1 3.3 2.5 1.5 4.4 girls need to be empowered by instead of be powered over

 One of the last interviews made of fazle abed covering 1970-2017- ngo advisor had just rated brac most effective /efficient 

“The idea behind BRAC is to change systems of inequity” says Sir Fazle, CEO of BRAC

you can find a come bottle in every corner of the world but not alwasy a vaccine

Published by Jean-Christophe Nothias on January 6, 2017 related search "science of delivery"

As NGO Advisor announces the new edition of the Top 500 NGOs, we’ve decided to launch a series of interviews with executives of organisations that are part of the rankings, the Ivy League of the “for-good” world. Sir Fazle Hasan Abed, Founder and Chairperson of BRAC, opens the series on behalf of 118,000+ employees working for what we acknowledge as the most influential and impactful for-good organisation worldwide.

by Jean-Christophe Nothias | Editor-in-chief, NGO Advisor

 

Jean-Christophe Nothias (JCN): Being ranked #1 (again in 2018) is an achievement and a fantastic recognition, but it is also challenging. Is there a “too big to fail” risk associated with BRAC?

Sir Fazle Hasan Abed (Sir Fazle): First, on behalf of the entire BRAC family, allow me to express my deepest gratitude for NGO Advisor’s recognition. There are many civil society organisations in the world today working diligently to bring about change in their societies. For BRAC to be placed at or near the top of such a list is a great honour indeed.

I would not say BRAC could ever be “too big to fail.” In Bangladesh, many of the functions that previously only BRAC and other nongovernmental organizations were able to provide are increasingly performed by the State. Successive governments in Bangladesh have been able to reach many more communities through State primary schools, for instance. We see this as a sign of great success. 

I would add that “failure” is not seen as a bad thing at BRAC. I have always encouraged our staff to view failure as an opportunity to improve the services we provide.3.1 During our child survival campaign of the 1980s, our earliest pilots were actually a disaster. This was BRAC’s first attempt to go to a nationwide scale, with a training program that taught rural women how to mix and administer their own oral rehydration solution for children’s diarrhea using locally available water, sugar and salt. At first, fewer than 10 percent of the mothers we had trained actually used the solution. 5.1 We revised the training again and again until we achieved a 100 percent success rate, and then scaled it up to reach every mother in Bangladesh.

 

JCN: As we explore the non-profit world looking for excellence, it seems like successful organisations are designed more like ‘systems’ than specialized ventures. BRAC addresses a diversity of concerns and embeds many different types of entities to act, some being non-profit, some for-profit corporations. Do you believe this is the future, in order to have a lasting impact and be sustainable? Will social enterprise revolutionize a non-profit sector that is still sticking to the charity approach?

Sir Fazle: The idea behind BRAC is to change systems of inequity, that is true. There are some BRAC programs, however, such as our 1.3 ultra-poor graduation program, which are always likely to require some level of subsidy. I would not call this a “charity approach”, however, since the aim is always to graduate the poorest into sustainable livelihoods, instead of remaining reliant on others.

There are many ways to change the basic conditions of society. One is the social enterprise approach. To use one example—2.5 BRAC built a dairy company called Aarong Dairy, which purchases milk from women farmers many of whom took microloans to buy cows. It is now the largest private dairy company in Bangladesh. This represents one way to create greater opportunities for the poor efficiently and at scale.

But government, civil society organizations, social enterprises, and for-profit corporations all have a role to play. There is no one-size-fits-all model.

I’ve always recognised that donor funding wouldn’t always be there for us. In order to provide long-term solutions at scale—to create significant change in a country like Bangladesh, or in any of the other 10 countries where we work—we have sought a degree of sustainability by developing our own sources of income. I believed we should try never be too reliant on donors.

With microloans, for instance, we recover our costs through service fees charged to clients. We also run social enterprises that serve the poor while generating a surplus for BRAC, in sectors as varied as dairy, textile and 3.2 seeds. This surplus is used to fund programs like education and health.

We even have a commercial bank, 1.4 BRAC Bank, which operates 1.5 bKash, a mobile money platform. By some measures, including the number of regular clients—about 25 million—bKash is now the largest mobile money platform in the world.

Yet it is important to stress that many of our most successful programs, including most of our operations outside Bangladesh, still rely on donor contributions. Our operations in Bangladesh are close to 80% self-financed and, with support from our partners, I anticipate that this proportion will rise in the coming years.

JCN: With an organisation of over 118,000 employees being so impactful, do you think that BRAC has become a poster boy for management schools? Has the Harvard Business School included BRAC in its curriculum?

Sir Fazle: Harvard Business School has indeed prepared several case studies on BRAC which are included in its curriculum. In development circles, one of the things we are best known for is the “science of delivery”—the efficient delivery of services to people in need. This is something businesses can learn from as well.

I agree with Jim Kim, the World Bank president and a proponent of the science of delivery, who says it’s no longer so much a question of what to deliver, but how to deliver it. Perfecting the science of delivery, even for very simple ideas such as the oral rehydration therapy mentioned earlier, can help us uproot even the most deeply entrenched poverty.

If BRAC is emblematic of anything, however, I would like to hope it is a concerted, long-term effort to transform the basic conditions of one’s society.

 

Would you say that young citizens with a fresh diploma should join an organisation such as BRAC or look for a job in the banking industry?

Sir Fazle: When young people approach me about starting a career in development, I often suggest they spend a couple of years working in the private sector first. When I worked at Shell Oil, I learned how to manage large operations efficiently, something I think served me well when I started BRAC.

That said, for those with a desire to serve others, especially people born with few advantages and opportunities, a career in this field is extremely satisfying. At BRAC, I have always tried to give people substantial responsibility coupled with an appropriate level of authority so they have the space to learn, develop and even make mistakes!

 

JCN: BRAC’s assumption is that poverty is a system and its underlying causes are manifold and interlinked. Is BRAC a challenge to politicians, or to put it a little differently, do politicians see BRAC as representing some sort of a challenging or competing power to their public duties and power?

Sir Fazle: Certainly not, although perhaps we are a challenge to corrupt politicians. There are many functions, such as education and health care, which can and should be performed by a well-functioning State. As mentioned earlier, the Bangladeshi government has recently done a much better job of making sure that people from poorer areas and backgrounds have access to primary schools. In situations like this, BRAC has very willingly stepped back to let the government do its job.

Politicians tend to see BRAC as a resource, not as a competing power. We provide teacher training to improve state school systems, for example. 4.4 Through BRAC University, we are educating a new generation of civil servants in Bangladesh. Our community health programs work alongside formal health systems, not in competition with them—linking the poor with government clinics, for example, or guiding a pregnant woman to a hospital when complications occur, so that she may have a safe birth surrounded by trained medical personnel. Wherever we work, we seek to help governments function better, not to replace the government.

 

JCN: Over the next five years, BRAC aims at creating a more inclusive society in Bangladesh, one where inequalities would not rise. Can anyone stop such a tide?

Sir Fazle: Having witnessed such change since Bangladesh’s independence in 1971, I am an optimist. Life expectancy was just 47 years in 1971, due largely to the high rate of child mortality. About a quarter of children did not live to the age of 5. Now life expectancy exceeds 70, and the under-5 mortality rate is less than 40 per 1,000 per live births. Maternal mortality has decreased by 75 percent since 1980; infant mortality has more than halved since 1990. We have also brought down fertility rates from about seven children per woman to replacement level. It has been said that such rapid changes in public health have almost no historical precedent, save perhaps for Japan following the Meiji Restoration.

I believe these changes have taken place in large part because we have developed a more inclusive society—one in which women are empowered to make their own decisions, such as to educate their daughters, instead of being oppressed by patriarchal traditions. Although Bangladesh is still a very conservative society, we have not only met but exceeded gender parity in education, meaning there are now more girls in school than boys. This is a tremendous achievement.

Yes, there are forces that can stop the tide, including the instability of our institutions and threats to law and order. These are challenges faced the world over. We have faced them in the past and come through them, so I remain an optimist.

 

JCN: As regards its international expansion, where do you see BRAC’s next battles?

Sir Fazle: 1.6 We are developing a strategy to broaden our international outreach, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa, where the basic conditions of many people’s lives remain much the same as when we started in Bangladesh. I would like to see BRAC launch operations in several more countries there in the coming years.

 

JCN: If there were a ‘Davos of the non-profit sector’ sometime soon, would you like to participate and what would your keynote speech be about?

Monday, July 26, 2021

1.3

 Jul 26, 2021

Even before the pandemic reversed progress in reducing extreme poverty, policies and programs largely failed to meet the needs of the poorest and most marginalized. Unless that failure is corrected, the most severe forms of poverty will remain entrenched long after the COVID-19 crisis ends.

DHAKA – From 1990 to 2019, the number of people living in extreme poverty (according to the World Bank threshold of $1.90 per day) plummeted, from 1.9 billion to 648 million. COVID-19 has reversed much of this progress. By the end of 2021, the pandemic will have pushed approximately 150 million people back into extreme poverty.

Even before COVID-19, however, the world was not on track to end extreme poverty in the next decade. Progress on poverty reduction had been slowing long before the pandemic hit, with global poverty rates falling by less than half a percentage point per year between 2015 and 2019. At that pace, even without COVID-19, 537 million people would have still been living in extreme poverty in 2030, implying failure to meet the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, in particular SDG 1.

At BRAC, the world’s largest Global South-led NGO, decades of designing, implementing, advising on, and adapting poverty reduction interventions have given us insights into how to make anti-poverty programs and policies more effective.

First, programs need to reach people in the most extreme states of poverty. People living in extreme poverty face hurdles to accessing social programs and services. They are less likely to have bank accounts, permanent addresses, or formal identification – all of which may be required for registration. They also face social stigma associated with receiving public services, and often lack sufficient information about the programs for which they are eligible.

In low-income countries, 79% of the bottom quintile of earners receive no social assistance whatsoever. To ensure that help reaches those most in need, governments and their partners must design policies and programs that overcome the barriers people living in extreme poverty face and integrate them into existing social safety nets.

Second, programs must empower people living in extreme poverty to build long-term resilience. Governments and their partners must do more than improve the provision of basic needs. They must also invest in enabling people in extreme poverty to acquire the skills and resources they need to avoid falling back into the poverty trap. This approach is crucial in times of crisis, as our team at BRAC found when advising the Philippine government, in partnership with the Asian Development Bank, on a recent anti-poverty intervention.

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During the pandemic, the program connected participants to cash assistance from the national government and food assistance from their local government. Meanwhile, it provided the resources and training they needed to establish multiple sources of income. As a result, 76% of participants were able to continue earning income even during strict lockdowns.

Third, programs need to treat poverty as multifaceted and context-specific. Extreme poverty is multidimensional. An accurate definition must account for the many areas of deprivation people living in extreme poverty face, from lack of clean water and electricity to malnutrition and social exclusion. These deprivations and the interventions needed to overcome them vary across populations and geographies. Based on an assessment of factors related to specific locations and socioeconomic contexts, governments and their partners need to create more holistic interventions that empower poor people to face their unique challenges.

Fourth, these programs must engage local communities and governments, whose active participation can help anti-poverty interventions better reflect the realities of people’s daily lives and gain local buy-in. Bringing civil society into the process can also play an important role in holding government accountable and sustaining demand for more effective programs and policies. And local governments can help national governments and their partners identify marginalized households and support their social inclusion.

Fifth, governments and their partners must learn what is working and what is not, then adapt programming accordingly. To maximize the impact of anti-poverty interventions at scale, governments and their partners must commit to monitoring, evaluating, and learning from programs as they are implemented, then revise them as needed.

Such evaluations should begin by identifying the principles driving programs’ design. Program components must then be tweaked and tested with those principles in mind, and the outcomes carefully monitored. Only through evidence-based adaptation can governments and their partners ensure that the programs they implement have a long-lasting impact and adjust to meet the unique and evolving needs of their people.

This must be a collaborative effort. If the international community adopts these steps, anti-poverty programs and policies can become more inclusive, adaptive, and comprehensive. Beyond engaging civil society and academia, governments need development actors, including multilateral institutions and donor countries, to help close resource gaps until they can independently mobilize sufficient domestic resources. Many low- and middle-income countries simply lack the fiscal space and state capacity to pursue large-scale poverty reduction measures on their own.

SDG 1 is deeply connected to the other SDGs, from ensuring gender equality to advancing sustainability to improving nutrition. COVID-19 has reversed decades of progress in these areas, and we need cross-cutting interventions that support multiple areas of development simultaneously if we are to recover. The only way to prevent leaving many people behind is to ensure that anti-poverty interventions are better funded, more holistic, and more effective at scale.

Sunday, July 25, 2021

3.4 fighting tb and the world's deadliest animal - malaria's mosquito

 the global fund bundles budgets for malaria. tb and aids together

in 2005 gates awarded abed their health prize mainly for innovation in fighting tb but also malaria

at brac the worldwide knowhow leader for tb and malaria is i think the same


brac brief on malaria and tb

hence 2021 latest repotfro gates on malaria may be of interest

By Bill Gates | August 25, 2021
Welcome to Mosquito Week 2021 on the Gates Notes.
Last year, many people feared a malaria catastrophe. An analysis by the World Health Organization found that disruptions to malaria control and treatment due to COVID-19 could lead to a dramatic increase in malaria deaths in sub-Saharan Africa.
A year later, I’m happy to report that this worst-case scenario, at least for now, has been avoided.
This Mosquito Week I share the story of how African countries averted disaster by quickly adapting their malaria programs to meet the challenges of the pandemic.
I also highlight the research the U.S. military is doing to combat the mosquito, which has caused more casualties for troops than bombs and bullets.
Finally, I provide an update on an amazing breakthrough that might control the spread of dengue fever, a terrible mosquito-borne disease that infects 400 million people every year.
Thanks for your interest in learning about all the innovation underway to fight diseases spread by the world’s deadliest animal.