Join in celebrating the 30 most productive collaborations 2020-1970 of women empowered sustainability generation goals 1 -5 and help log advances to 2025 Fazle Abed partners and 1billion girls mapped these 30 collaborations -six each for education , health, food/land, finance to end poverty, societal platforms for partners in 100% community (women as productive as men, young & old, colored & white
education opportunities 4.1 adult skills; 4.2 primary; 4.3 teen ; 4.4 university; 4.5 pre-school ;4.6 multidisciplinary education luminaries health opportunities
3.1 oral rehydration 3.2 para health "doordash" basic medicines 3.3 scale vaccination 3.4 tuberculosis 3.5 Frugal processes eg wash sanitation, maternity; 3.6 James Grant School of public health food/land opportunities
2.1 rice 2.2 veggie 2.3 cash crops & village fair2.4 poultry 2.5 dairy, 2.6 14 nation leading supply chains financial opportunities to end poverty
1.1 change aid (sustainable charity), microfinance+, 1.3 ultra poor, 1.4 city bank 1.5 bkash, 1.6 hq2 brac intl netherlands
platforms for 100% lives matter community (women as productive as men , all skin cols equal opportunity etc)
5.1 100k person metavillage; 1 billion asian women, brac net, 5.4 100 asian universities share sdg graduates 5.5 climate smart village exchanges, 5.6 zoom me up scotty: adamsmith.app 2022: year 264 in search of moral market leadership

Sunday, July 25, 2021

3.4 fighting tb and the world's deadliest animal - malaria's mosquito

 the global fund bundles budgets for malaria. tb and aids together

in 2005 gates awarded abed their health prize mainly for innovation in fighting tb but also malaria

at brac the worldwide knowhow leader for tb and malaria is i think the same


brac brief on malaria and tb

hence 2021 latest repotfro gates on malaria may be of interest

By Bill Gates | August 25, 2021
Welcome to Mosquito Week 2021 on the Gates Notes.
Last year, many people feared a malaria catastrophe. An analysis by the World Health Organization found that disruptions to malaria control and treatment due to COVID-19 could lead to a dramatic increase in malaria deaths in sub-Saharan Africa.
A year later, I’m happy to report that this worst-case scenario, at least for now, has been avoided.
This Mosquito Week I share the story of how African countries averted disaster by quickly adapting their malaria programs to meet the challenges of the pandemic.
I also highlight the research the U.S. military is doing to combat the mosquito, which has caused more casualties for troops than bombs and bullets.
Finally, I provide an update on an amazing breakthrough that might control the spread of dengue fever, a terrible mosquito-borne disease that infects 400 million people every year.
Thanks for your interest in learning about all the innovation underway to fight diseases spread by the world’s deadliest animal.

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